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News Flash: World's First Lab Grown Steak

Would you eat lab grown steaks/meat?

  • Yes

  • No


Results are only viewable after voting.

Mikazuki Marazhu

I hate you all
Good Morning, welcome back to FaF Channel 7 News. This is your host Mikazuki Marazhu.

Very recently a lab in Israel have produced the world's first lab grow steak.

This is done by taking a cow tissue sample, isolating the stem cells, adding a special syrum to the cells that encourages cell multiplication and lastly adding proteins that differenciate muscle tissues from fat.

The meat is still in it's early stages of development and but prototypes are now available in few select markets for $50

Though in technicality. This is not this is not the first ever lab grown meat to be sold. Back in 2013 a lab gown burgerbeef was sold 230,000 euros.

The advancement of lab grown meat will sure have implications on Meat Eaters, US' 200 billion dollar Meat industry and the environment.

What do you guys think?
Would you eat lab grown meat?
Do you think this is a win for animal welfare advocates?
What environmental implications will this have?

Sources:

theguardian.com: World’s first lab-grown steak revealed – but the taste needs work


www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/aleph-farms-lab-grown-meat/amp/
 

Yakamaru

Very Speshul Title
This is kinda inevitable with how technology is progressing. It's hella useful for space travel as you can just make meat from stem cells. Imagine if we could just throw a pill inside the micro like in Fifth Element and poof, a chicken. Or even a whole meal.

The potential usage for this is rather vast.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
To be honest, if it tastes good and isn't full of carbs, this diabetic will eat it.

I don't care where it comes from.
 

Muln

NPC.Furry.Muln.12367
Banned
This is kinda inevitable with how technology is progressing. It's hella useful for space travel as you can just make meat from stem cells. Imagine if we could just throw a pill inside the micro like in Fifth Element and poof, a chicken. Or even a whole meal.

The potential usage for this is rather vast.
Interesting but you still need something to grow these things. If you're lugging mass amount of materials like proteins/syrums to make the meat. (Law of thermodynamics if I remember correctly)
 

Yakamaru

Very Speshul Title
Interesting but you still need something to grow these things. If you're lugging mass amount of materials like proteins/syrums to make the meat. (Law of thermodynamics if I remember correctly)
It have a lot of potential though, as a food source.

In a couple of decades we might see people's choices be between real and synthetic meat.

Dunno how the morons over at PETA will react though..
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Interesting but you still need something to grow these things. If you're lugging mass amount of materials like proteins/syrums to make the meat. (Law of thermodynamics if I remember correctly)

Currently foods like Quorn, which is a sort fungus, are grown in fermenters that provide them with the warmth and nutrients that they need to build more complex macromolecules.
You can probably envisage a process by which a fungus would produce proteins, that could then be passed to an animal cell-culture, which would assemble them into flesh.

This is thermodynamically more efficient than eating a real cow, that has spent a lot of energy throughout its life doing things like moving around and making noises, rather than growing flesh.

It would be even more efficient to eat the precursor fungus directly though.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
It have a lot of potential though, as a food source.

In a couple of decades we might see people's choices be between real and synthetic meat.

Dunno how the morons over at PETA will react though..
Who cares what PETA thinks these days?
 

Yakamaru

Very Speshul Title

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
Vat meat is cool in concept, but it'll still be some time until it's ready to be pushed as a viable alternative on a large scale.

Currently foods like Quorn, which is a sort fungus, are grown in fermenters that provide them with the warmth and nutrients that they need to build more complex macromolecules.
Quorn also can be prepared to have a taste/texture pretty darn close to chicken. It and mifu (milk protein-based tofu) are probably my favorite vegetarian protein products.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
Vat meat is cool in concept, but it'll still be some time until it's ready to be pushed as a viable alternative on a large scale.
Honestly, cricket farming is probably the most cost-effective and green protein source we will ever have.
Pound for pound, crickets yielding the same amount of protein yield far less greenhouse gas and use less resources, such as feed and space.

Also, they're crickets and most people can't humanize them like many can with cows.
We're far more likely to step on a bug than to sledge a cow in the head, for sure.
 
I

Infrarednexus

Guest
Call me old fashioned, but I prefer eating meat that came from the natural way, preferably if the animal was well treated. I'm not saying this is wrong, but eating meat that was made in a lab just doesn't sit right with me personally.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Call me old fashioned, but I prefer eating meat that came from the natural way, preferably if the animal was well treated. I'm not saying this is wrong, but eating meat that was made in a lab just doesn't sit right with me personally.

If we intended to give meat to a population of 10-12bn humans, we'll probably have to do it at some point.

Either that, or maybe each of us can just eat meat less frequently. Maybe eat meat once or twice a week instead of once a day.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
Call me old fashioned, but I prefer eating meat that came from the natural way, preferably if the animal was well treated. I'm not saying this is wrong, but eating meat that was made in a lab just doesn't sit right with me personally.
and if the meat were indistinguishable?
 

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
Call me old fashioned, but I prefer eating meat that came from the natural way, preferably if the animal was well treated. I'm not saying this is wrong, but eating meat that was made in a lab just doesn't sit right with me personally.

Wait..but you were made in a lab..Mr. Android! :rolleyes:
 
I

Infrarednexus

Guest
If we intended to give meat to a population of 10-12bn humans, we'll probably have to do it at some point.

Either that, or maybe each of us can just eat meat less frequently. Maybe eat meat once or twice a week instead of once a day.
I understand the benefits and I support this scientific path. I see it as a solution to ending hunger in a lot of places where proper nutrition is scarce. I'm just saying I don't want to eat it personally, yet.

and if the meat were indistinguishable?

Then I suppose I would give it a try. It's not based on my morals or ethics, but rather just my personal comfort zone. If it really is no different from naturally harvested meat, then I see no harm in enjoying a nice lab steak with some steamed veggies and BBQ sauce.

Wait..but you were made in a lab..Mr. Android! :rolleyes:
I want to be a real boy too ;w;
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
I understand the benefits and I support this scientific path. I see it as a solution to ending hunger in a lot of places where proper nutrition is scarce. I'm just saying I don't want to eat it personally, yet.



Then I suppose I would give it a try. It's not based on my morals or ethics, but rather just my personal comfort zone. If it really is no different from naturally harvested meat, then I see no harm in enjoying a nice lab steak with some steamed veggies and BBQ sauce.
I can see the other side of the argument, though. Don't get me wrong.
We could end up with a sort of 'Tasty Wheat' problem.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I understand the benefits and I support this scientific path. I see it as a solution to ending hunger in a lot of places where proper nutrition is scarce. I'm just saying I don't want to eat it personally, yet.



Then I suppose I would give it a try. It's not based on my morals or ethics, but rather just my personal comfort zone. If it really is no different from naturally harvested meat, then I see no harm in enjoying a nice lab steak with some steamed veggies and BBQ sauce.


I want to be a real boy too ;w;

I totally understand your personal comfort zone point. I haven't eaten meat for years, so even if making meat didn't involve high carbon emissions or animal slaughters, eating again would just feel weird; I'm not sure I'd even enjoy it. x3


One of my friends, who used to be Muslim, is like this too. He never used to eat pork, and now he 'technically can' but is so used to not eating pork that he just doesn't really do it; it would feel odd.
 
Z

ZeroVoidTime

Guest
If we intended to give meat to a population of 10-12bn humans, we'll probably have to do it at some point.

Either that, or maybe each of us can just eat meat less frequently. Maybe eat meat once or twice a week instead of once a day.
Either that or soylent green is another option for meat alternatives.... I do agree with Infrarednexus the genetically grown steak is a creepy concept and could not fathom eating it or the aforementioned soylent green.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
Either that or soylent green is another option for meat alternatives.... I do agree with Infrarednexus the genetically grown steak is a creepy concept and could not fathom eating it or the aforementioned soylent green.
I have no qualms with eating people if it really came down to it.

js
 

Firuthi Dragovic

Gamer Dragon, former speedrunner
Lab-grown meat? Honestly, I'd consider it, though I can't help but feel like I won't enjoy it. Though to be fair, I'm actually more used to fish and venison (Tacoma stop staring at me like that).

I definitely could not see myself going the full Soylent Green path unless it was literally the only food left (at which point we're screwed anyhow).

As far as the animal welfare advocates bit, though, I suspect lab-grown meat would only a win for SOME of them. Those farm animals are still going to need to wind up going somewhere and I don't think a lot of people are in a position to adopt cattle. Pigs and chickens, maybe, but not cattle.
 

Apoc-Volkov

Mechanical Mind
Considering that the vast majority of the food we currently produce goes towards feeding food, shifting the meat industry from livestock to vat-grown would not only be a more efficient means of producing meat but also allow for much greater food production as one of many side effects.

Setting aside matters regarding the humane treatment of livestock, which is rather appalling at the industrial scale, animal husbandry in the modern era is both a heavy investment in resources that could be better allocated elsewhere and a pretty significant, if minor, source of carbon emissions, not just from the machinery used in the process but also the animals themselves (Cattle farming is especially bad for this).

Ultimately however, given how the vast majority of people in Western societies are affluent to where their food comes from, I sincerely doubt that many would object to eating a vat-grown steak if it otherwise has the look, taste and texture of a slab of dead cow. With that in mind, imagine Hindus finally being able to eat beef without the moral ramifications of a cow being harmed to obtain it.

As for other side effects of such a paradigm shift, along with advances in hydroponics, you're essentially looking at a relatively compact means by which we can provide a source of sustenance for settlements in remote regions where vast agricultural tracts are not viable, like the high arctic, the Sahara Desert, or even some colony on Ceres.
 
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