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Nintendo Sucks

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
No, that was proven false. The roms they used were from Animal Crossing in the GameCube. There is a source for that.

From a rando on this forum:

"Yep, the Virtual Console ROM does in fact originate from Animal Crossing. iNES header and all. In fact, all of the NES games in Animal Crossing have it, with the notable exception of Clu Clu Land D, which lacks a header entirely, starting with the "*NINTENDO-HVC*"

It shows that Nintendo has been using iNes headers far longer than virtual console releases.
 

LuxerHusku

The Unlucky Husky


" The .NES header, originally created by Marat Fayzullin for his iNES emulator, is used to provide emulators with the necessary context needed to recreate a hardware setup that changed with each and every cartridge. Finding it in this Nintendo-published version of Super Mario Bros. felt like a sign we were heading in the right direction.

At this point I contacted Fayzullin himself, providing him with the files we'd obtained. He then compared this with various pirated Super Mario Bro. ROMs found online and discovered the ROM content was identical.

"There are minute differences between ROM dumps," explained Fayzullin. "Depending on the cartridge version and how it has been dumped. If you see that your .NES file DOES NOT match any of the ones found online, it is likely to be their own ROM dump. I have cut the ROM content out of the Wii file you sent me and it indeed matches the .NES file found online." "
Eh, even if they actually did, at the end of the day, it’s their game. I don’t think it’s them being hypocritical about people downloading roms when they have every right to take them.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
Eh, even if they actually did, at the end of the day, it’s their game. I don’t think it’s them being hypocritical about people downloading roms when they have every right to take them.
Sure.
Hypocrisy is ok if...
Yeah, not buying it.
 

LuxerHusku

The Unlucky Husky
Sure.
Hypocrisy is ok if...
Yeah, not buying it.
If you want to think of it that way, then sure, go ahead, but know that these games are owned and licensed by Nintendo. They hve every right to take those sites down, like it or not. As I said before, it’s all old news and they will never stop.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
If you want to think of it that way, then sure, go ahead, but know that these games are owned and licensed by Nintendo. They hve every right to take those sites down, like it or not. As I said before, it’s all old news and they will never stop.
I don't really do the whole "Do as I say, not as I do"
It's a sign of really bad parenting.

If Nintendo doesn't like piracy, they just should have used their own headerless versions of games they've been keeping in their vault, either ripped from their own master carts or pulled from whatever storage device holding the master digital.

Using someone else's header, regardless of what it's on, is technically its own form of software piracy, considering it's code Nintendo never made but is utilizing in copies of games being sold.
It's just as bad as someone, say, selling a bootleg console with a bunch of games preloaded onto it.
Doesn't need to be of equal scale. Theft is theft.

If you really wanna go that route, at least stay consistent about it.
 

LuxerHusku

The Unlucky Husky
I don't really do the whole "Do as I say, not as I do"
It's a sign of really bad parenting.

If Nintendo doesn't like piracy, they just should have used their own headerless versions of games they've been keeping in their vault, either ripped from their own master carts or pulled from whatever storage device holding the master digital.

Using someone else's header, regardless of what it's on, is technically its own form of software piracy, considering it's code Nintendo never made but is utilizing in copies of games being sold.
It's just as bad as someone, say, selling a bootleg console with a bunch of games preloaded onto it.
Doesn't need to be of equal scale. Theft is theft.

If you really wanna go that route, at least stay consistent about it.
To do that instead of taking it from sites that already did their work? I could see them taking the easy route of clamming those cites and re-releasing them. Might be wrong some people but it’s not illegal since they do own them in the first place. Plus, it’s a good business decision.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
To do that instead of taking it from sites that already did their work? I could see them taking the easy route of clamming those cites and re-releasing them. Might be wrong some people but it’s not illegal since they do own them in the first place. Plus, it’s a good business decision.
iNES emulation requires a license, per the iNES author's website.
Considering this, it can be assumed that the code in the ROMs are also under license, making the use of them dubious.
 

LuxerHusku

The Unlucky Husky
iNES emulation requires a license, per the iNES author's website.
Considering this, it can be assumed that the code in the ROMs are also under license, making the use of them dubious.
It really doesn’t matter much at this point. So Nintendo had done some shady stuff and they’re also too C&D with their IP. It’s nothing new. As I said, they’ve been like that for decades and people still treated as a huge problem. We still buy and support their games in the end.

I mean, I know Nintendo isn’t perfect, as I do have a few issues at their practices, but in the end. I still like their games and services. And I think the general Nintendo audience doesn’t seem to care as well. I play fangames and even homebrew, but at least I understand the consequences of them. That’s why I don’t have any problem with Nintendo showing up and shutting them down.

I don’t blame them from protecting their IP, but what the online community should do is not advertise their sites and projects of Nintendo games, as that can lead to big issues. Seen that happened a lot. Especially AM2R, Pokemon Uranium, No Mario’s Sky, Mario 64 HD Remake, and Pokemon Prism.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
I don’t blame them from protecting their IP, but what the online community should do is not advertise their sites and projects of Nintendo games, as that can lead to big issues. Seen that happened a lot. Especially AM2R, Pokemon Uranium, No Mario’s Sky, Mario 64 HD Remake, and Pokemon Prism.
Sure.
Let's apologize for big corp punching down on fan projects made out of love and not for money.
Thumbs up.

You can love Nintendo for whatever reason, but you can't deny that more and more people are getting pissed.
Just hope Nintendo gets its head out of its ass so you don't become a minority, yeah?
 

LuxerHusku

The Unlucky Husky
Sure.
Let's apologize for big corp punching down on fan projects made out of love and not for money.
Thumbs up.

You can love Nintendo for whatever reason, but you can't deny that more and more people are getting pissed.
Just hope Nintendo gets its head out of its ass so you don't become a minority, yeah?
You do know they don’t want to risk having their IPs being jeopardized, right? Not only Nintendo, but Sony, Microsoft, and yes, even Sega. Remember that Streets of Rage 1 Remake from a fan? Yeah, Sega took that down. There was also the fanmade server and modded Halo Reach that was only for Russia on PC that Microsoft had to step in and take it down cause many people out of Russia was using it.

So yeah, it’s not just Nintendo, dude.
 

Stratelier

Well-Known Member
You do know they don’t want to risk having their IPs being jeopardized, right?
If you want the biggest example of an "IP" being jeopardized in the court of public opinion, look no further than the MPAA's old "X" rating.
No, really.
When the MPAA invented their rating system, they trademarked every label except "X", assuming at the time there couldn't possibly be any problems whatsoever with allowing film producers to self-apply the highest, most restrictive label in their system. Until the pornography industry happened. Not only did they self-apply the X rating they also expanded on it with "XX" and "XXX" labels, and over time the rating itself became culturally associated with porn films over its official intended meaning. So the MPAA fixed it by creating a new label for the same rating (NC-17) and trademarking it, but it remains a poster-child story of what can potentially happen when a company doesn't apply the proper legal protections over something they created.

Now, of course the key word there is what can "potentially" happen -- the vast majority (90% and up) of fan projects just don't have the same potential to intrude on (let alone displace) the official product in the market of either customer opinion or customer wallets. But that doesn't change the underlying legal principle of it any, does it now?

Again with respect to ROMs an emulators, Nintendo's biggest gripe is how emulators generally cannot play an authorized copy of the game straight off an official disc or cartridge (or digital purchase), instead requiring the intermediate step of "dumping" (copying) the code and assets into a separate file. The whole point of copyright is controlling who gets to make and distribute copies of something, but digital media is fundamentally different from physical media in its basic ability to be copied and distributed.
 

LuxerHusku

The Unlucky Husky
If you want the biggest example of an "IP" being jeopardized in the court of public opinion, look no further than the MPAA's old "X" rating.
No, really.
When the MPAA invented their rating system, they trademarked every label except "X", assuming at the time there couldn't possibly be any problems whatsoever with allowing film producers to self-apply the highest, most restrictive label in their system. Until the pornography industry happened. Not only did they self-apply the X rating they also expanded on it with "XX" and "XXX" labels, and over time the rating itself became culturally associated with porn films over its official intended meaning. So the MPAA fixed it by creating a new label for the same rating (NC-17) and trademarking it, but it remains a poster-child story of what can potentially happen when a company doesn't apply the proper legal protections over something they created.

Now, of course the key word there is what can "potentially" happen -- the vast majority (90% and up) of fan projects just don't have the same potential to intrude on (let alone displace) the official product in the market of either customer opinion or customer wallets. But that doesn't change the underlying legal principle of it any, does it now?

Again with respect to ROMs an emulators, Nintendo's biggest gripe is how emulators generally cannot play an authorized copy of the game straight off an official disc or cartridge (or digital purchase), instead requiring the intermediate step of "dumping" (copying) the code and assets into a separate file. The whole point of copyright is controlling who gets to make and distribute copies of something, but digital media is fundamentally different from physical media in its basic ability to be copied and distributed.
Again, they don’t want to risk it. You see people had been leaning more to Melee and dropping Ultimate all because of the Slippi mod and better netcode to play online. Of course, you can say that Nintendo should start fixing their netcode, but I am sure it’s not as easy as it sounds. Then people pirating the game is another major issue for them cause piracy.

You can definitely have fan projects take over official titles, and it does rarely happen, but still Nintendo is very sensitive about it and doesn’t want to risk loosing money. Seems not likely, but they’re just don’t wanna let it happen.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
Know what happens when people aren't allowed to make fan art, games, etc?
People get angry.
And when people get angry, they stop caring about stuff.
And when people stop caring about stuff, the company loses money.

Nobody is leaving Ultimate just because Dolphin has rollback netcode in the form of Slippi AND if fans can come together in their off time and implement rollback netcode into games, Nintendo should surely see that there's a huge hole in the market and be able to fill it.

If Nintendo actually had good netcode, people'd want to play their game more.

Shit, GGPO rollback is open source and could be implemented under MIT license, which is free.
 

Trevorbluesquirrel

Well-Known Member
being the disney of video games isn't a good thing lol
Disney is kinda awful too. Like they COULD turn a blind eye to some of these things or even support it; SEGA supports fanworks a lot as an example.

Actually yes! A fan recently remade the Zelda CDi games to be playable on Windows PC.
The animation for the games is kinda charming, even if it is really goofy to look at. Music isn't bad either. Gameplay sucks donkey balls though lmao. You can't tell what's a platform and what isn't and enemies will spawn in front of you as you walk
Actually, I found the proper links, and got the games to work! Thanks so much for the tip! Now I ain't got to keep fiddlin' with the real CDI!
 
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