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Noise Music

J

Jelly

Guest
best be trolling

Associated Acts: "Wavanova."

upon looking for it you get the following
a
ytmnd user
last.fm user
youtube user
flashflashrevolution.com user
facebook user
and its all the same hilarious man

i think xipoid meant to use the word "lackluster"

i like my dick like i like my noise
harsh

hurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
 
J

Jelly

Guest
I'm not sure what this is supposed to mean

I'm posting like an asshole.
I just wanted to highlight that for a minute, so that's where that comes from.
I don't need to be mean about it.
Maybe he's nice and funny to those who like that kind of comedy.

I don't know.

probably couldve just made a post on a forums board if he's looking for that much attention

It means:
I like being raped and I like pukey music.
 

Xipoid

Cameras
Associated Acts: "Wavanova."

upon looking for it you get the following
a
ytmnd user
last.fm user
youtube user
flashflashrevolution.com user
facebook user
and its all the same hilarious man

i think xipoid meant to use the word "lackluster"

i like my dick like i like my noise
harsh

hurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr


What
 

Dyluck

hi ilu :>
Did you read the page?

am i the only one who read the page?
aw man :C

i guess
it might be a bit too much for me, though
and if it isn't making some kind of message about the oppression of farm animals
well, im basically not going to cum

I saw that he was going to the BtBaM show that I went to last night and I was like :3 but that was it

It's rape who cares if you come or not
 

Azure

100% organic vegan hubbas
I've been meaning to go to another live noise show, but they don't put the shows on during the Winter. :c

I saw a few groups. I watched one guy viciously beat the crap out of a pumpkin with a hammer. It was visceral and stupid. I liked it.

But the rest of it had a very featureless thing going on. People would just have a really loopy looking machine (like this one guy Fellahean, had a wooden box with a Jacob's Ladder attached to it) that played the same KKKKKKKKKKKKKK, one conceptual thing. Not really looping, not changing at all. And they would play it for about 10-15 minutes.

I was more drawn into the crowd.
Because nobody really knew what to do until the end.
And the end was always abrupt, there was never a slow come down, there was never a change in the loop.

it was just KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK______________

But the second it went off, everyone was tripping over themselves to come up and just touch this guy in his thrift store outfit, gut hanging about 5 inches over his pants.

I don't know what this is all about.
Maybe they just don't know what they're listening to.
Or maybe I don't know why they're doing it.

whatever
insight into this whole phenomenon is nice, i guess
That sounds like a complete waste of time.
 
J

Jelly

Guest
That sounds like a complete waste of time.

The one guy who smashed the pumpkin was great.
It was a pretty visceral experience, but I've always believed that going to see music should include seeing some kind of crazy stage performance as part of it.

So, that was really a neat experience for me.

But the other people were pretty boring, and it was clear they were pandering to a crowd that wasn't looking for something interesting to be done with KKKKKKKKK they were just looking for KKKKKKKKK.
anyways,
to quote a convo that happened between two metalheads outside the bar:
"whats the crowd like in there?"
"fucking gay."

there was a good noise-ambient group
and a phenomenal free jazz duo
 

Endless Humiliation

Banned
Banned
Hey LB do you like my new theme

Yeah it's cute David


The only real noise show I've seen is Melt-Banana Lite which was Yasuko and Agata playing with I think they were like samplers or something. Agata had what looked like a glowing trackball strapped to a calculator and it was INVIGORATING especially since I was in the front row. I like to think that the Wapanese looking kids next to me hated it but they probably loved it :cool: One love I Jah



Anyways here is a paper I wrote about noise. I think it got a B+ I don't know I never asked. The second half was really rushed so I might go back and fix that up among other things.

Punk, well, all sorts of hard rock music, have been known to some as “noise”. And “noise music” (hereafter referred to as NM) seemingly revels in that classification, transcending the need for even the simplest three chords or guitar-bass-drum trifecta. So it seems particularly apt that the first book I find on punk rock is entitled, “The Philosophy of Punk: More Than Noise”. In that same vein, another book is named, “Noise/Music: A History”. This is worth noting, as the former title operates on the condition that punk music is sometimes derisively classified as “noise”, however the author chose to use this label in a sarcastic manner, as he champions punk in its various forms. The latter title, in contrast to this, shows a commonly accepted separation of “noise” and “music”, however this is in the interest of remaining objective, as the book is “about noise, about how noise relates to music, and the different ways we arrive at noise music...It is a history of how, in the twentieth century, noise has become a resource, was incorporated into musicality and rejected musicality, while all the while occurring in the place of music” (Hegarty, ix). These two distinct genres share similar qualities, “Early Punks (perhaps quite unknowingly) used many of the same revolutionary tactics employed by members of early avant-garde art movements: unusual fashions, the blurring of boundaries between art and everyday life, juxtapositions of seemingly disparate objects and behavior, intentional provocation of the audience, use of untrained performers, and drastic reorganization (or disorganization) of accepted performance styles and procedures” (O’Hara, 32-33). Both are typically abrasive, with stage shows that branch out into the confrontational. Both relied, at least at the genesis, on a “do-it-yourself” method of distribution. And, perhaps most importantly, both are typically the province of disaffected white kids.
Before we can talk about NM or punk, there needs to be a primer on musique concrète, which was invented by the French composer, Pierre Schaeffer, while he was working at RTF, a French radio station, during and after WWII. According to Hegarty, “Many avant-garde musicians in the post-war period were disappointed that standard music seemed to have reached some sort of limit with serialism, but did not want to ditch musicality altogether” (Hegarty, 32). Hegarty goes on to note that, “For Schaeffer and [later collaborator] Pierre Henry, found sounds were transcribed directly into records” (Hegarty, 32). Schaeffer utilized the radio station’s record players, mixers, filters, and microphones to develop a new kind of composing, “Schaeffer’s first completed piece (Etude aux chemins de fer) is built from the sounds of trains. Whether using a single sound source (which would be layered, altered, distorted, cut-up) or multiple sources, the key principle in musique concrète was montage” (Hegarty, 33). Etude is strangely rhythmic, for having been constructed entirely out of train noises. The clattering of the trains over tracks gives the piece a crude sort of “beat”. None of the sounds repeat for very long. There are whistles, chugs, clicks, and some unidentifiable sounds. Schaeffer unintentionally paved the way for a whole host of modern pop and avant-garde musics. Tape loops are a staple of experimental rock and were used by The Beatles to great effect in Revolution 9. Tape loops were also the realm of contemporary composers, like Stockhausen and Reich.
Reich is just such a composer, poised to take the baton of Schaeffer and pass it on to the experimenters of today. One of Reich’s early pieces was made exclusively with tape loops, and was entitled, It’s Gonna Rain. The piece consists of a recording of a preacher giving a sermon about the end of the world in San Francisco’s Union Square. The phrase “it’s gonna rain” is looped, however Reich lets the loops fall out of phase with each other, so the phrases overlap, creating a kind of hypnotic chant. Eventually, “[t]he sound moves back and forth across the stereophonic spectrum, the left and right channels sliding smoothly in and out of unison. Soon, the listener's ear begins to fashion musical gestures out of the jumbled sounds as speech melts into pure aural texture” (Grimshaw). Speaking on his influences, Reich had this to say, “Basically, ‘It's Gonna Rain’ was done in '65. At that point, I already studied with (Luciano) Berio.* I had listened to a lot electronic music and a lot of musique concrete.* I felt that my heart belonged to the musique concrete people.* Even with Stockhausen, I was interested in "Gesung der Jungling" because of the boy's voice.The bone I had to pick with (Pierre) Schaeffer and that bunch was that if they were using the sound of a car crash, they had to lower it by an octave or speed it up by an octave, run it through a ring modulator or play it backwards.* Why not hear that it's a car crash!* These sounds that you're using in the original state have some kind of emotional resonance.* We relate to them in various ways.* If you bring them into the music, that brings in an emotional, theatrical meaning which is useful.* It's worthwhile maintaining and building upon.” (Reich, Perfect Sound Forever interview)
The music isn’t “noise” yet, but the stage is set.
One of the first albums to be tagged as “noise” is Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music, released in 1975, which consists of guitar feedback played at different speeds. The guitars were tuned to non-standard tunings, placed against amplifiers, and the feedback from the amps would vibrate the strings, causing loud ringing tones as well as lower distorted ones, “I would tune all the strings, say, to E, put the guitar a certain distance from the amp, and it would start feeding back. The harmonics would start mixing, going into something else. It was as if the guitar was hitting itself” (Reed, MMM liner notes). The original vinyl ended in a locked groove on side four, “I thought Metal Machine Music would be such fun if you actually had to get up to turn it off” (Reed, MMM liner notes), a definite call-back to Schaeffer and Reich. MMM looped possesses that same quality as Etude aux chemins de fer or It’s Gonna Rain, “The strange thing about the locked groove is that it is the very point at which the squall suddenly becomes structure: a circular lopsided wave or rhythm and distortion” (Fricke, MMM liner notes). This differs from punk in that punk often has a defined melody and rhythm, but both rely on the importance of repetition to get their message across, whether it be high-minded or low-brow. Reed knew what he was doing. According to him,
"I was very serious. John Cale made me more aware of electronic music and he had worked with [avant-garde musician] Lamont[e] Young. He had introduced me to the idea of drone. And I was involved with the idea of feedback and guitars and playing around with tape recorders, so I decided to make a piece of music that didn't have lyrics and didn't have a steady beat and concentrated on feedback and guitar not being in any particular key--playing with the speeds. I was serious about it. I was also really, really stoned" (The Stranger interview).

Reed remains sincere in his insistence that MMM should be taken just as seriously as his other rock records, “The truth is that I really, really, really loved it. I was in a position where I could have it come out. I just didn't want it to come out and have the audience think it was more rock songs” (Pitchfork Media interview). The total effect of Metal Machine Music has been indescribable. The album was a jumping off point for both modern NM and what would come to be known as industrial. If we look at Lou Reed’s work outside of MMM, we see rumblings of “protopunk”, so Reed can be considered a godfather & innovator in both the noise and punk worlds.
It’s not a far cry to say that modern day NM could have, and in a few cases has, sprung forth from the minds of punks, tired of a self-made rut and disillusioned with the whole scene. To that end, this new music delivers. There are numerous artists who flirt or flit between the two styles, the largest being, arguably, Sonic Youth, who got their start in the No Wave scene of early 80’s New York, which itself mashed punk and the avant-garde. Sonic Youth has constantly championed bands and musicians skirting the edge of the underground, and through their label, Ecstatic Peace!, have put out records by prominent NM artists, including RRRecords owner Ron Lessard, who performs under the name Emil Beaulieau. Not to be outdone, Sonic Youth has experimented with this style themselves, releasing Silver Session for Jason Knuth, an album of guitar feedback dedicated to a Sonic Youth fan who had committed suicide. Silver Session bears an obvious similarity to Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music (Cited by Japanese NM legend, Merzbow as a huge influence, so much so that he named one of his early albums Metal Acoustic Music in response). Incidentally, one of Sonic Youth’s later flirtations with NM, SYR8: Andre Sider Af Sonic Youth, was a collaboration between free jazz saxophonist Mats Gustafsson and Merzbow himself.
Not to say that Sonic Youth is the most important band bridging NM and punk, but they are certainly the most apparent. Another notable group is Man Is The Bastard, a powerviolence band (powerviolence being a term coined by MITB in the early 1990’s, and which combined the speed and ferocity of grindcore with the raw dissonance and political attitudes of hardcore) who featured cacophonous interludes on their albums, but later switched to full-time cacophony, changing their name to Bastard Noise. The band can be seen as a bridge between the harsher ends of punk and noise. Their “trademark sound” comes from the instrumentation, which features two bass guitars in place of standard six-stringers, which, combined with various other instruments (noisemakers, electric guitar) produces a very sludgy chaotic music. When the band became Bastard Noise, the bass guitars were removed and in its place were noise machines designed and built by MITB/BN member Henry Barnes, “The AFC/ROAR "caveman electronics" (that Barnes built many years ago) and the Trogotronic electronics that [Bill] Nelson builds today. I think the element of time being together (Nelson and I) is also a glorious amenity that gives a priceless strength to our labour in this unit. Chemistry and patience are everything to us” (The Sleeping Shaman interview). These electronics give the band, “an organic warmth that is lacking in many digital noise projects. We are the "vinyl" of "noise" so-to-speak. The variety of vocal styles used is also unique and stands out from others in this genre” (The Sleeping Shaman interview).
One of the founding members of MITB and later, Bastard Noise, Eric Wood, cites as inspiration Merzbow and the long-running Belgian grindcore band Agathocles, who invented the term “mincecore” to describe their version of grind with a socio-political purpose (Vice Magazine interview). MITB’s political side is readily apparent, with song titles such as “Puppy Mill” and “Feet Binding”. They have also done a split CD with death row prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal. On the noise side, Wood has talked at length on his infatuation with NM,
“I really like noise, I really dig noise. A lot of its variables and a lot of its different angles. Noise is more limitless than any music, it was here before that, it's the only thing that doesn't seem to be derived from a fucking culture. There are cultures that try to blood-suck it like a lake-leech, but they're merely hanging around something that's existed before life...I guess maybe that life is noise, maybe noise is the occurence of some kind of life being exterminated or being born or somewhere in between. Noise is just one of those weird entities...there's a lot of noise bands out there, and a lot of them are fantastic bands, but true noise, or pure noise I should say, that's not derived from a typical instrument is what we fancy a lot” (Holy Mack'l Dere zine interview).
At its inception, punk was designed to be a reaction to the arena rock of the seventies, with no soloing and short songs. The sounds of the early groups ranged from bubblegummy (Ramones) to a sort of proto-heavy metal (The Stooges). The bands all came from big cities: NYC, Detroit, and LA. The lyrics were very rarely political. It was a sonic expression of angst and dissatisfaction with society. It wasn’t until British bands began experimenting with punk that the political aspect really came out in full force, with The Clash and Crass being some of the bigger political bands.
Hardcore punk came about in the early eighties, and relocated punk from the cities to the suburbs. Author of American Hardcore: A Tribal History, Steven Blush, says, “Fucked-up but intelligent White kids populated the Hardcore scene. Their legacy included the Cold War, inflation, industrial decline, post-Vietnam trauma, shitty music, bad cops, and racial turmoil. They suffered from depression, alienation and frustration. Some were do-gooders who resented their own relatively high socioeconomic status or harbored guilt over their forebearers’ racism. Others seethed with hatred for the outsiders stealing jobs and ruining neighborhoods. Real or imagined, that was the vibe” (Blush, 30). That latter segment was responsible for the promulgation of skinhead punks, who tended to have conservative, if not reactionary, politics, “The rise of Hardcore coincided with the rise of Skinhead culture. In some ways the scenes overlapped. Edgier HC types adopted Skinhead style. A shaved head was the perfect fuck-you to Hippies and businessmen alike - not to mention moms and dads. The important thing was shock value. Politically speaking, many HC kids leaned to the Left, but the Right claimed its share of adherents. In other words, Hardcore Skinheads came in two varieties: racist lunkheads and anti-racist lunkheads. Very few embraced the style and remained unfazed by the politics. Some racists’ hatred was heartfelt; for others it was just another confrontational tool. The same was true of anti-racists” (Blush, 31). Anarchist activist Tad Kepley, says that, “It wasn’t until the mid 80s that I did see a lot of Right Wing politics pop up in the scene; around ’85 was when a big Skinhead explosion took place. Early on, I didn’t see all these nazis - I always thought the more immediate threat were police and metalheads and jocks” (Blush, 32). New York City had its own brand of hardcore punk, labeled NYHC (New York HardCore) for short, which tended to have a more metallic sound. Blush points out that, “NYHC saw two distinct eras. In ’81, Punk’s possibilities empowered a small free-for-all of open-minded bad kids...In the more violent second period, which began by 1985, participants more likely embraced seemingly Right-Wing philosophies - overrun with Skinhead gangs and Straight Edge zealots” (Blush, 173). Some of the bands leading this second wave included Agnostic Front and Murphy’s Law (whose vocalist was named Jimmy Gestapo). It’s not known exactly what prompted this sudden swap of Left for Right, but it could be linked to the popularity of Ronald Reagan. 1985 would have been during his second term in office, and that, coupled with New York’s conservative nature (the kind that elected Rudy Giuliani) may have been what turned hardcore’s boogeyman into an idol.
From the get-go, it seems that punk has always been a white person’s territory. Rock and roll has been mainly white for a long time. There have been exceptions, however. Bad Brains are recognized as innovators of hardcore punk and their members were all black, Rastafarian, and Bad Brains played reggae and dub music in addition to punk. Says Blush, “Despite its overwhelmingly White demographic and the starkness of its racial politics, Hardcore received important infusions from a few Black kids - most notably the Bad Brains, who were to Hardcore what Hendrix was to Psychedelia; DKs drummer DH Peligro, Skeeter Thompson of Scream, Eugene Robinson of Whipping Boy, Chuck Treece of the Philly skate band McRad, and Sam of Impact Unit (in which Mighty Mighty Bosstones’ Dickie Barrett also played). Their participation testifies to some of Hardcore’s better attributes” (Blush, 33). Pete Stahl, singer of Scream, says that, “In a scene that was definitely segregated, we were a statement against that [racist] mentality” (Blush, 33).
“Noise rock”, a style that rose to prominence around 20 years ago, has an even bigger following now in the 2000’s, with first-generation bands reuniting and putting out new albums and newer bands taking up the torch. Lightning Bolt is a well known duo made up of Brian Gibson on bass and Brian Chippendale on drums and vocals who hail from Providence, Rhode Island and are associated with Load Records, one of the leading noise rock labels. They play concerts on the ground with the audience circled around them and play at extremely high volume. According to Gibson, “We used to get more negative reactions when [we] didn't have as loud of stuff. It's just, be super loud and you're all set...The rock and roll has been revealed. I do feel that that’s the message - if there’s any message, that’s what it is” (The Power of Salad DVD). Noise rock embodies a variety of hard rock styles including punk, metal, and various experimental and psychedelic styles. Earlier noise rock bands like Big Black and The Jesus Lizard had a very loud and abrasive sound and shared much in common with hardcore punk. These earlier bands were influential on the grunge movement in the early 1990’s, while Nirvana showed that there was a market for clamorous rock and roll. It was in this decade that noise rock began to expand, splinter, and mature. Industrial groups such as Ministry and Nine Inch Nails showed clear signs of being influenced by these early groups. There was also a melding of underground styles, with The Locust playing powerviolence with keyboards, something almost unheard of in any punk subgenre. In the new millennium, the style has spread beyond America, but American bands like Hella and HEALTH are keeping the genre fresh. However, outside of hipsters, noise rock has no real lasting significance. At least not like that of punk or hardcore. The music is apolitical and mainly an excuse for scrawny white guys (and sometimes girls) to go nuts and have a good time.
There is some crossover with noise rock and NM. Some noise rock bands wear costumes when performing (Lightning Bolt) and so do some NM bands (Caroliner, who perform in garish neon get-ups, producing a very disorienting effect), to the point where there is a “genre” jokingly devised by the NM scene for “costume noise”. Both genres are known for targeting more intellectual music fans than punk. Where hardcore has that driving beat you can mosh to, NM and noise rock oftentimes has no consistent beat, which makes it difficult to dance to (Modern noise rock is often less danceable than the older stuff, in that it is more removed from the hardcore scene, and as such, tends to forego the hardcore form in favor of musical experimentation). As far as “pure” NM goes, the performers tend to come from a comfortable background and were raised on hardcore or metal, occasionally both, something that spurred their interest in more abrasive music. Where hardcore is the music of proles, noise is for intellectuals. After all, it is the avant-garde re-imagined and re-appropriated by average guys, albeit average guys who like to make unpleasant sounds and scream into microphones. So it’s also not a surprise that NM is white as fine china. “Intellectual” is usually code for “white upper-middle class elitist” and in terms of appeal, that is really the target audience. It’s hard to imagine a generic kid from “the ghetto” really digging Metal Machine Music, but it’s easy to imagine him starting his own punk band, inspired by any number of bands, and where punk has its roots in rock and roll, a genre indebted to blacks, NM finds its beginnings in the early 20th century avant-garde, strictly white, European (or European/Anglo-Saxon origin) fare. This makes it perfect for hipsters who want to seem smart and cultured. Not to say that NM is only hipsters making music for hipsters. With the Internet, kids are finding out about more music quickly, to the point where someone can be a metalhead at age 13 and releasing his own noise by 15. In the future, we can expect NM to be a more populist genre, while other “intellectuals”, hipsters, what-have-you, scope out the new thing. NM is already being incorporating into other “extreme” genres, such as black metal and grindcore. When asked about the parallels and overlaps of NM and grindcore, Beau, guitarist for grindcore band Insect Warfare said, “Well, I see noise music as being the next step as far as how extreme you can make music. Then again, noise is so passe now that I think even that’s losing it is edge. Hipsters are making noise music using Le Tigre samples theses days. I don’t think that’s very extreme but it is happening somewhere and that sucks. It makes sense to me why so many death metal and grindcore guys later go into noise; you can only go so many years trying to play as fast as possible and trying to level the world around before you realize sonic/audio terrorism is the only answer. Look at Mick Harris (Drummer for Napalm Death). He played as fast as you can in that style and even he’s doing noise these days. As far as parallels being drawn between noise and grind, I think that both genres were kind of created with the same idea of ‘lets just making the craziest fucking shit we can come up with and piss everyone around us off.’ [sic] That’s what I appreciate about both forms of music. Fuck being friends with everybody. I want to crush people’s eardrums. If they can’t deal with that, then they could never understand me anyway.” (Short Fast & Loud #17). In a way, this represents a real landmark in the history of pissing your parents off. Where before you had punk rock and roll, now you have noise eradicating people’s eardrums. Truly, this is progress.

Personally I think it "lacks focus"
 

Azure

100% organic vegan hubbas
So basically noise music is hipsters trolling people. Not surprised.
 

Endless Humiliation

Banned
Banned
Well really it is hipsters appropriating what used to be considered cutting-edge avant-garde music which I'm pretty sure I talked about in my paper which I doubt you read because you are a fucking cartoon character
 

Isen

Oh dear
I thought it was interesting.

I am slowly but surely continuing to explore grindcore and hardcore. I recently picked up some stuff by Siege, Ripcord, and Wasted Time. Recommendations are always appreciated.
 

Azure

100% organic vegan hubbas
Well really it is hipsters appropriating what used to be considered cutting-edge avant-garde music which I'm pretty sure I talked about in my paper which I doubt you read because you are a fucking cartoon character
No I read it. Your style need work, and I don't speak music theory. Also, replace avant garde with horrible shit, and you've got a pretty revolutionary statement there.
 

Endless Humiliation

Banned
Banned
I don't take music theory

Also what are some style tips in case I ever have to write for a major music publication

Thanks
 
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Endless Humiliation

Banned
Banned
I just...I...I want to know why it is that you are so resistant to avant-garde Azure

I mean, you like jazz, right? Yes? And jazz is all about improvisation right?

It's just, I...I..I I don't know why you have to be such a mean guy about it




That was my Woody Allen impression
 
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