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Norse mythology

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Deleted member 134556

Guest
So due to quarantine I’ve been doing lots of reading on mythology (Greek, Eastern, Norse etc) and I’ve gotten an interest in classic Norse tales of the Gods and creatures. I’m making this thread for us to share and talk about our favorite mythological characters, stories, not just Norse, but any mythology really. Feel free to post pics, links, and opinions here of anything you like.

(I will not tolerate using Norse elements to glorify hateful/extremist ideologies. I will report those and have them removed the minute I see them)
 

Starbeak

Born in Space, endlessly exploring star-systems
Playing Smite and reading the Lore behind the characters in something not many people do. I find the Lore fascinating. I might go back to read more Lore just for fun. ^v^
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
I wonder if they had burgers back in those days, that would be living.
In Valhalla you are served unlimited meat and alchohol, and you will never get bloated or have hangovers, so I’m sure you’d find something to your liking
 

Mayflower

Chocolate horse delicacy
I was very interested in mythology as a child - especially Norse mythology. Since I'm from a Scandinavian country, I've always seen it as an important part of my cultural history. I also had easy access to both historical texts and the cartoons and comics for kids, and I loved to memorize details of the various gods. I knew more about Norse mythology than about Christianity while growing up. I probably still do, though I've forgotten a lot.

I always found the stories of Ragnarok to be especially sad and depressing. I knew about it of course, but the more I read about the Old Gods, the sadder I got knowing that they were always destined to die during Ragnarok :(

There were several things that just stuck in my mind for various reasons - usually some unpleasant or scary details from the stories. Like the sheer size of the Midgard Serpent, or the means that the gods used to bind Loki. But the one mental image that I found the most uncomfortable as a child, was the wolves Skoll and Hati catching and devouring the sun and the moon at the start of Ragnarok - plunging the world into darkness :eek:
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
I was very interested in mythology as a child - especially Norse mythology. Since I'm from a Scandinavian country, I've always seen it as an important part of my cultural history. I also had easy access to both historical texts and the cartoons and comics for kids, and I loved to memorize details of the various gods. I knew more about Norse mythology than about Christianity while growing up. I probably still do, though I've forgotten a lot.

I always found the stories of Ragnarok to be especially sad and depressing. I knew about it of course, but the more I read about the Old Gods, the sadder I got knowing that they were always destined to die during Ragnarok :(

There were several things that just stuck in my mind for various reasons - usually some unpleasant or scary details from the stories. Like the sheer size of the Midgard Serpent, or the means that the gods used to bind Loki. But the one mental image that I found the most uncomfortable as a child, was the wolves Skoll and Hati catching and devouring the sun and the moon at the start of Ragnarok - plunging the world into darkness :eek:
I’ve read a few books on this, and you bring up some good talking points. From my knowledge at least, the thing to consider about Ragnarok is that the Norse/Viking people lived in a constant struggle of survival and fighting, and reputation and honor where a huge part of their ideals since it was the primary and occasionally only thing they left behind to their communities when they died. Ragnarok was considered not something to mourn over for the early Vikings and Norse people, but something embrace with enthusiasm. They saw it as the ultimate opportunity to test their courage and valor. The Gods during Ragnarok fought constantly, and without fear. They knew they would all perish, but they didn’t go out with a whimper, but with a bang. This attitude is what made the Vikings Vikings.
 
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Z

ZeroVoidTime

Guest
In Valhalla you are served unlimited meat and alchohol, and you will never get bloated or have hangovers, so I’m sure you’d find something to your liking
Right but if I recall correctly it requires a warriors death in order to gain entrance to Valhalla.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
Right but if I recall correctly it requires a warriors death in order to gain entrance to Valhalla.
Correct, the rest are reserved to go to Hel, which is not really a bad place despite the name. From Prose Edda and other writings, Hel is described as a second earth almost. People eat, sleep, and live their lives there like they would on Earth. It certainly wasn’t a place of suffering as later literature depicts it after the conversation of Christianity in later years
 

Ovidia Dragoness

Udder Derg
Banned
Screenshot_20201010-155926_YouTube.jpg
 

Ashwolves5

Miss Fluffy Bottom
I’ve always thought it interesting that most of the days of the week are originated names from Norse gods
 

xdontyoufakeit

Kaiju Master & aspiring artist
Norse mythology is so vast and interesting!
I like that story of Odin (if I remember correctly) that he is one-eyed because he exchanged it for wisdom. It's like no sacrifice is too great to get what you want.
I had researched some of the aspects of Norse mythology because I was planning to write a comic with the valkyries, but I haven't touched those drafts in a long time.
 
D

Deleted member 132067

Guest
Free time for old Norse and Germanic rambling? Always. Putting the whole "I've been interested because blah blah blah" aside, because my profile screams enough pagan for people to notice my interests, there's one thing about the mythology that I especially like.

It's that the gods are personalities much more than they are just a deity connected to their respective aspects. You could call Óðinn a god of war, of wisdom or magic. But what is far more interesting is how believable his character is.
He knows about Ragnarök, the death of himself and of mostly everyone he knows and loves. It's why he made a pact with Freya to have her Valkyries bring half of all fallen warriors to his hall. To gather an army in hopes of prolonging or even evading his death. It just makes sense, he wouldn't want to cheat his death after knowing of it? Furthermore he even tricks humans into killing each other, through wars and battles that he caused, just to increase the size of his army. Sometimes he even kills strong warriors by himself, or cheats them into sacrificing themselves to him. It's not a good thing to do, it's pretty much the opposite of it. It's great because it's believable.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
Free time for old Norse and Germanic rambling? Always. Putting the whole "I've been interested because blah blah blah" aside, because my profile screams enough pagan for people to notice my interests, there's one thing about the mythology that I especially like.

It's that the gods are personalities much more than they are just a deity connected to their respective aspects. You could call Óðinn a god of war, of wisdom or magic. But what is far more interesting is how believable his character is.
He knows about Ragnarök, the death of himself and of mostly everyone he knows and loves. It's why he made a pact with Freya to have her Valkyries bring half of all fallen warriors to his hall. To gather an army in hopes of prolonging or even evading his death. It just makes sense, he wouldn't want to cheat his death after knowing of it? Furthermore he even tricks humans into killing each other, through wars and battles that he caused, just to increase the size of his army. Sometimes he even kills strong warriors by himself, or cheats them into sacrificing themselves to him. It's not a good thing to do, it's pretty much the opposite of it. It's great because it's believable.
I always saw Odin as a pursuer of knowledge. His desire to learn the secretes of the universe has no limits. He sacrificed his eye to drink from a well that held wisdom and even hung himself from a branch of Yggdrasil for nine days to discover the runes. It’s a bit disturbing knowing the lengths he went and is willing to go, but it’s enough for me to personally consider him a god of wisdom. This is only a fraction of his character tho, but the one that most stands out to me personally.
 
D

Deleted member 132067

Guest
Certainly, Óðinn as a god of wisdom next to the most predominant aspects, death and war, is often both portrait in his character as well as in his very name from a linguistic standpoint.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
Certainly, Óðinn as a god of wisdom next to the most predominant aspects, death and war, is often both portrait in his character as well as in his very name from a linguistic standpoint.
Got any favorite Gods/Goddesses or creatures?
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
Valhalla was reserved those who died in battle.

Commoners, women, elders, children, etc were send to helheim. Am I right or do I need to put my nose back in a book?
Nope your pretty much right
 
D

Deleted member 132067

Guest
If a women
Valhalla was reserved those who died in battle.

Commoners, women, elders, children, etc were send to helheim. Am I right or do I need to put my nose back in a book?
If a women fights and dies during it she ends up in Valhöll, too. Think of shieldmaidens for example.
That technically goes for anything, be it elders or children. Although many stories have Óðinn collect warriors when they are the most physically fit, suggesting that he prefers them, despite not being the one who transports them to his hall.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
If a women

If a women fights and dies during it she ends up in Valhöll, too. Think of shieldmaidens for example.
That technically goes for anything, be it elders or children. Although many stories have Óðinn collect warriors when they are the most physically fit, suggesting that he prefers them, despite not being the one who transports them to his hall.
I forgot about that. It wasn’t exclusive to gender. Thanks for pointing that out for us
 
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