• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Critique: Please convice me that my drawing is not that good.

Lithio

Internet Newbie
Hello, I seek advice. I have recently created this piece for someone in a request. It is a drawing done just a few days ago and I am indeed proud of it. However too proud, it feels. I've been laying off drawing since then. So what I would like from all you people is some honest feedback to shatter my pride in this work. I know, critiques are generally a good thing. I'm not sure of what to improve on specifically.
faf-resize-req-003.png
 

MissNook

Well-Known Member
I only do sandwich criticism, so you'll have to bear with me here :D

First thing, the perspective is good! It's not easy to do that kind of perspective and it's really cool to see. It adds a lot of dynamic to the drawing :)

However you may want to work on contrasts more. I remember that you use a 2B pencil (may be wrong on that XD). It should be nice to add a bit of 6B to have some more depths in some parts and therefore differentiate more the volumes. Under the wing to our left just at the junction with the torso that would have add a more readable volume, same on the other wing near the armpit.

Except for this, you're doing a great job in term of volume and pose. Keep up the great art!
 

Vinfang

Indie Game Artist / Telegram: vinfang
can better define musculature and texture on body; or add a dynamic background to enhance perspective. also, use thicker outline to emphasize closeness in relation.
 
Last edited:

redhusky

Emperor of Floof! King of the Rats and Spamlord!
Hello, I seek advice. I have recently created this piece for someone in a request. It is a drawing done just a few days ago and I am indeed proud of it. However too proud, it feels. I've been laying off drawing since then. So what I would like from all you people is some honest feedback to shatter my pride in this work. I know, critiques are generally a good thing. I'm not sure of what to improve on specifically.
View attachment 87437
Two things I would work on:
1. The silhouette is too cramped and it's making the composition hard to read.

2. You don't have any indication of the "ground plane" and it's giving it the "space junk" error. I gave an explanation of "space junk" and how to fix it here:
forums.furaffinity.net: Critique: - Perspective & Foreshortening

Of the two, #1 is more important to work on atm.
 

Lithio

Internet Newbie
Thank you guys for the feedback! I made a drawing, a little bit quickly, but more to focus on the conceptual things pointed out here. Hopefully this is an improvement.
I only do sandwich criticism, so you'll have to bear with me here :D

First thing, the perspective is good! It's not easy to do that kind of perspective and it's really cool to see. It adds a lot of dynamic to the drawing :)

However you may want to work on contrasts more. I remember that you use a 2B pencil (may be wrong on that XD). It should be nice to add a bit of 6B to have some more depths in some parts and therefore differentiate more the volumes. Under the wing to our left just at the junction with the torso that would have add a more readable volume, same on the other wing near the armpit.

Except for this, you're doing a great job in term of volume and pose. Keep up the great art!
Thanks a lot, I've been reading Ernest R. Norling's Perspective Made Easy book for the past month and that probably helped me a lot. About the 6B though, the day after this drawing was the first time I went to an art supply store. It was spectacular, I was like a kid walking into a candy store. I indeed bought a 6B and 8B pencil, made by different manufacturers respectively, along with a few colour pencils to replace the old elementary school ones I am currently using. I was gazing at all the items for so long that one of the clerks offered me help to pick something!
can better define musculature and texture on body; or add a dynamic background to enhance perspective. also, use thicker outline to emphasize closeness in relation.
Thanks! I have little experience with muscle anatomy and texturing so thanks for bringing that up. There's just so much to learn right now so hopefully that can be covered soon! My "visual library" is quite low, so I added a few blocks in the background in 2 point perspective, (trying) to give the illusion that we are looking up at an angle.
Two things I would work on:
1. The silhouette is too cramped and it's making the composition hard to read.

2. You don't have any indication of the "ground plane" and it's giving it the "space junk" error. I gave an explanation of "space junk" and how to fix it here:
forums.furaffinity.net: Critique: - Perspective & Foreshortening

Of the two, #1 is more important to work on atm.
Ah, thanks for the critique! I just did a little bit of reading on composition on a few websites. I think I wanted the most attention at the wing's claw on our left. The spines of the wings converge toward the claw and the other arm somewhat leads towards the claw and head. I hope this is an improvement. As for the ground plane, you made a good explanation but I'm not too sure how to work it out when the figure is in the air because the ground plane is far below. Taking Vinfang's suggestion, I put some blocks in the background to try to give an idea of where in space the figure is.

The drawing:
IMG_20200528_150728.png
 

ChozetsuDynamisch

Well-Known Member
Your bat art might looking good, and great job! I also do traditional art but no longer do it anymore.

You might try free commissions request service yourself...
 

TyraWadman

The Silent Observer
It seems like you're grasping the fundamentals extremely well!

I think the next part you have to consider, in order to improve, is what your end goal is. What do you want to be able to achieve?

If you're looking for something new though, perhaps you could try inking and coloring your traditional art? If you're worried about messing up, be sure to take a pic of it before hand!
I personally can't afford to make mistakes so I stick with digital.
 

Lithio

Internet Newbie
It seems like you're grasping the fundamentals extremely well!

I think the next part you have to consider, in order to improve, is what your end goal is. What do you want to be able to achieve?

If you're looking for something new though, perhaps you could try inking and coloring your traditional art? If you're worried about messing up, be sure to take a pic of it before hand!
I personally can't afford to make mistakes so I stick with digital.
Thanks, I haven't thought of end goals much before reading this - in fact, the most accurate way to describe what I've always been aiming for is simply "get better..." I'll try taking a picture of any upcoming drawings from now on! I've been considering some of the advice posted here, mostly on composition. I've been trying a bit of smudging to darken the shades of pencil but inking sounds pretty cool. (I got some gel pens that I picked off the floor at school before they all went online!)

Just for the sake of showing, this is my latest (finished) drawing for a request. I don't like it much for some reason and haven't shown it to the requester yet. I probably spent more time on it than I should have for a request. This was an experiment of smudging.
6-21-critique-01.png
6-21-critique-02.png


I know, I haven't looked at anatomy yet and now I feel bad for showing this! There was a procedure I learned for drawing that used a "ground plan" for creating a drawing in perspective. It's not that clear in the top image, but the long slanted vertical line is supposed to be for the bus. The bus was a 60 foot articulated model so it probably would have been a better choice to see it on its side to see its full length but later on I figured out that this was a drawing for the person who requested it, not for me! I'm a fan of buses, if that explains it better, and the original composition had too much of the bus in it and not the character.

I am thinking of switching to digital when I'm confident that I can draw well enough, but when that happens isn't easy to determine.
 
Last edited:

TyraWadman

The Silent Observer
Thanks, I haven't thought of end goals much before reading this - in fact, the most accurate way to describe what I've always been aiming for is simply "get better..." I'll try taking a picture of any upcoming drawings from now on! I've been considering some of the advice posted here, mostly on composition. I've been trying a bit of smudging to darken the shades of pencil but inking sounds pretty cool. (I got some gel pens that I picked off the floor at school before they all went online!)

Just for the sake of showing, this is my latest (finished) drawing for a request. I don't like it much for some reason and haven't shown it to the requester yet. I probably spent more time on it than I should have for a request. This was an experiment of smudging.

I know, I haven't looked at anatomy yet and now I feel bad for showing this! There was a procedure I learned for drawing that used a "ground plan" for creating a drawing in perspective. It's not that clear in the top image, but the long slanted vertical line is supposed to be for the bus. The bus was a 60 foot articulated model so it probably would have been a better choice to see it on its side to see its full length but later on I figured out that this was a drawing for the person who requested it, not for me! I'm a fan of buses, if that explains it better, and the original composition had too much of the bus in it and not the character.

I am thinking of switching to digital when I'm confident that I can draw well enough, but when that happens isn't easy to determine.

Dude, you might have skipped anatomy lessons but what you're drawing isn't bad at all. If anything, you'll be pro within a year one you pick it up!
As for smudging, I wouldn't use it to make things darker. Use it to blend or make something appear softer. The easiest example I could give would be shading hair.
There's nothing wrong with sticking to traditional, but you might learn that artists use certain tools to achieve certain effects, whether it be buying blending stubs or fancy pencil sets. I personally couldn't grasp this, and just used a plain 0.5 mm mechanical pencil and the eraser it came with for all of my paper drawings. Cost less that way.

As for the end-result, most people just say 'I want to be able to draw like ArtistNameHere' and try to follow/learn their techniques. Not saying you have to do the same though. You already seem to have an idea of what you want, it's just a matter of practice. I'm honestly jealous that you can plan out a composition so well (And include perspective!!!). I've been at it my whole life and I'm still struggling with it!
 

Lithio

Internet Newbie
Dude, you might have skipped anatomy lessons but what you're drawing isn't bad at all. If anything, you'll be pro within a year one you pick it up!
As for smudging, I wouldn't use it to make things darker. Use it to blend or make something appear softer. The easiest example I could give would be shading hair.
There's nothing wrong with sticking to traditional, but you might learn that artists use certain tools to achieve certain effects, whether it be buying blending stubs or fancy pencil sets. I personally couldn't grasp this, and just used a plain 0.5 mm mechanical pencil and the eraser it came with for all of my paper drawings. Cost less that way.

As for the end-result, most people just say 'I want to be able to draw like ArtistNameHere' and try to follow/learn their techniques. Not saying you have to do the same though. You already seem to have an idea of what you want, it's just a matter of practice. I'm honestly jealous that you can plan out a composition so well (And include perspective!!!). I've been at it my whole life and I'm still struggling with it!
The blending all comes from a small piece of paper that I fold up! The capital cost of a digital drawing tool is what is keeping me from buying one. I don't know how long it would take to pay off the investment.

Oh, if you want to know where I learned perspective from, it's from these two books: Perspective Made Easy by Ernest R. Norling and Fun with a Pencil by Andrew Loomis. They're both pretty old books but easy to understand. The last chapter in Perspective Made Easy that discusses about mechanical perspective felt really confusing but the section about ground plans in Fun with a Pencil seemed to describe the same thing a lot better in my opinion. The website I use to obtain those books is gen.lib.rus.ec which is a life saver, especially if you're studying engineering courses that require textbooks!

Just a P.S about the "I want to be able to draw like ArtistNameHere," I have heard various opinions of whether it is a good practice to adapt to an other artist techniques. My stance on that is to not draw like others.
 

TyraWadman

The Silent Observer
The blending all comes from a small piece of paper that I fold up! The capital cost of a digital drawing tool is what is keeping me from buying one. I don't know how long it would take to pay off the investment.

Oh, if you want to know where I learned perspective from, it's from these two books: Perspective Made Easy by Ernest R. Norling and Fun with a Pencil by Andrew Loomis. They're both pretty old books but easy to understand. The last chapter in Perspective Made Easy that discusses about mechanical perspective felt really confusing but the section about ground plans in Fun with a Pencil seemed to describe the same thing a lot better in my opinion. The website I use to obtain those books is gen.lib.rus.ec which is a life saver, especially if you're studying engineering courses that require textbooks!

Just a P.S about the "I want to be able to draw like ArtistNameHere," I have heard various opinions of whether it is a good practice to adapt to an other artist techniques. My stance on that is to not draw like others.

Thank you for the links! I'm definitely going to read into them!

Also, if you wanted, wacom has a basic Drawing Tablet that usually goes for around $100 or less, depending on where you are in this world/what model you buy. It's $100 for me, but I'm in Canada. So less if you're in the U.S!
There are newer brands coming out that might be cheaper, but I prefer a tablet that I don't have to buy my own batteries. The Wacom ones are USB powered and can cater to left or right handed preferences. All other brands that I've come across (so far) either have poor company rep, require batteries, or don't offer the best functionality for left handed artists (such as myself).

When it comes to software there are plenty of free options out there, but I would recommend PaintToolSai when you can afford it. It's around $50 I think? Possibly less for someone in the states. But it has an updated version that is smoother and efficient (like if you crash, it will save a backup!!!). It also comes with perspective rules you can tweak.

I don't disagree with not wanting to draw like other people, but my example would be: I would love to achieve the level of detail you see in some of the final fantasy 2d work (that looks basically semi-realistic 3d but isn't) BUT I would never want to draw like them because they all tend to have baby face and long legs. :[
 
Top