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Pricing: ¿Is this worth $60 or am i asking for too much?

Ramiel0912

Member
Hey everyone, i just finished my latest art piece and I was thinking about how much I could charge for something similar. I've drawn my entire life so I'm pretty confident about the quality of my work, but on the other hand, I'm relatively new to the community and I'm basically unknown, so should I be asking for less money taking that into consideration? Other things that I take into account is the fact that my style isn't for everyone (contrary to the more cutesy and popular stuff I've seen around) and that's okay, but this is the result of three days of work, so after all that effort, lowering the price considerably would feel kind of insulting tbh. Am I just really entitled or does this make sense at all? Anyways, I cant wait to hear what yall think ^^


Rem and Paine.jpg
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I do not believe your art is over-priced.
Make sure the price you charge for art exceeds an hourly minimum wage rate, because you deserve to be paid at least that.

Your art is very good so people should be happy to pay for it.

I am going to ping @Judge Spear because they are a more established and competent artist (and I think they have taken commissions).
 

Ramiel0912

Member
I do not believe your art is over-priced.
Make sure the price you charge for art exceeds an hourly minimum wage rate, because you deserve to be paid at least that.

Your art is very good so people should be happy to pay for it.

I am going to ping @Judge Spear because they are a more established and competent artist (and I think they have taken commissions).
Thanks a lot for the reply! i really appreciate it
 

TyraWadman

The Brutally Honest Man-Child
I am on my phone but from what I can see/Guage I would say 60$ for two upper halfs is reasonable/close to the underselling mark!

Not having that same cutesy/anime style is what's gonna make your art stand out easier so don't let that discourage you one bit!
 

Judge Spear

Well-Known Member
Short answer:
$60 is fine.

Long answer:
You're at a skill level where your pricing is going to largely depend on your following. You're not anything close to bad so $60 is beyond a fair starting point. No one will look at your work and be appalled that you would charge for the cost of a new game. But be mindful if you aren't raking in a lot of viewership (I don't know your metrics), that is going to inherently mean less potential clientele. Which means that the higher your prices, the less people will be able to pay for them.

Pulling numbers from my ass real quick, for every 1000 people following you, maybe 30-50 will be willing to buy anything at any price.
I'm sitting at nearly 30k on Twitter. When I open my commissions, I might get 20 legitimate bites (filtering out the the usual "I'd buy if I just had the munnies" types). That's just the nature of things. No one's fault. And that's why it's stressed that the more eyes on you, the more you charge and value return clients.

As you brand yourself and continue clawing away at an audience, this naturally becomes less of an issue and you can confidently charge more as you go.
In a perfect world, I'd call that worth $100. Minimum. But you need the clientele that will be willing to pay that. Take some clients at $60, see how things go. If people are really satisfied and you filled up quickly, bump up by an increment of $20 the next time you open. See how that works out. Commission pricing is a gradual process of experimentation.
 

Ramiel0912

Member
Short answer:
$60 is fine.

Long answer:
You're at a skill level where your pricing is going to largely depend on your following. You're not anything close to bad so $60 is beyond a fair starting point. No one will look at your work and be appalled that you would charge for the cost of a new game. But be mindful if you aren't raking in a lot of viewership (I don't know your metrics), that is going to inherently mean less potential clientele. Which means that the higher your prices, the less people will be able to pay for them.

Pulling numbers from my ass real quick, for every 1000 people following you, maybe 30-50 will be willing to buy anything at any price.
I'm sitting at nearly 30k on Twitter. When I open my commissions, I might get 20 legitimate bites (filtering out the the usual "I'd buy if I just had the munnies" types). That's just the nature of things. No one's fault. And that's why it's stressed that the more eyes on you, the more you charge and value return clients.

As you brand yourself and continue clawing away at an audience, this naturally becomes less of an issue and you can confidently charge more as you go.
In a perfect world, I'd call that worth $100. Minimum. But you need the clientele that will be willing to pay that. Take some clients at $60, see how things go. If people are really satisfied and you filled up quickly, bump up by an increment of $20 the next time you open. See how that works out. Commission pricing is a gradual process of experimentation.
Thank you, i find this insight really valuable!
 

Yudran

Active Member
I wish I could tell you to increase your price to $100, but I don't know much about commissions: I haven't opened commissions myself because my following is almost non-existent, so I'd go with what Judge Spear says.
It also depends on how long it takes you to produce such a drawing: don't charge less than minimum wage (and taking taxes into account).

You have an interesting style, your anatomy is superb (this is coming from someone who really struggles with anatomy: I'd love to have your anatomy skills!), and combined with your shadows I find it gorgeous. I have a feeling you've been practicing lighting with an asaro head for quite some time, because you're nailing those faces!
 
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