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Recently got a 720p TV, but nothing to try on it.

ADF

Member
I'd really love to see what high definition looks like on this TV, but I don't have access to any HD channels or movies disks/players. Don't get me wrong, SD quality movies still look amazing on it, but if SD looks this good (especially alien Vs predator) what does HD look like?

Does anyone have any idea's? I have plenty of HD trailers on my PC if there is a way to convert them for DVD playback at an HD res.
 

Cybergarou

Member
Yeah, your best bet is connecting your PC. Standard DVD technology doesn't support HD video. You could force HD video onto a DVD, but the bitrate would fall way short and the output from the player would still be the standard signal.
 

ADF

Member
I'd like to try that but the family don't like the idea of me lugging a brand new 37" TV up the stairs, I'd ask for their help but I'm the one that wants to try it not them.
 

Bloodangel

Banned
Banned
Bring the comp down? Say how you want to demonstrate the uberness of HD
 

ADF

Member
After posting the above I went down to check the back of the TV; there doesn't seem to be any connectors to hook it up to a PC, it has two scart and one HDMI. I don't know if it should have support as standard or requires a conversion cable, either way I cannot hook it up right now.

[edit]

Ah just looked it up at the retailer site;

http://direct.tesco.com/q/R.200-4972.aspx

No PC input, oh well what do you expect when your parents pick the TV? I would look for support.
 

ADF

Member
Just to update I made a custom DVD disk with downscaled versions of the trailers; I had them running at 9mb bit rates so it shows you can get HD quality data rates on a dvd disk, now it is getting them to play on the TV while retaining their HD resolution.
 

starla

New Member
Personally, I physically can't tell the difference between normal and high-definition displays. The optician says I have almost perfect vision, but apparently it doesn't extend to HDTV. Am I really missing anything?
 
starla said:
Personally, I physically can't tell the difference between normal and high-definition displays. The optician says I have almost perfect vision, but apparently it doesn't extend to HDTV. Am I really missing anything?

I can tell you that I see a definite difference between HD and non-HD content on my compy monitor.
 

Rhainor

Rawr.
starla said:
Personally, I physically can't tell the difference between normal and high-definition displays. The optician says I have almost perfect vision, but apparently it doesn't extend to HDTV. Am I really missing anything?

Yeah, you are, kinda (note, *kinda*).

You may be one of those few people who simply don't notice the extra resolution, due to the way your brain works.

It may also have something to do with the distance you're viewing from. Beyond a certain distance from the screen (which varies by screen resolution and screen size), it *is* physically impossible for anyone to tell the difference.

Here's a test. Using an SDTV, start as far back as you can, and gradually get closer to the TV until you can make out the individual pixels without squinting; record how far your face is from the screen. Then do the same with a 720p TV (preferably with about the same screen size as the first one), and again with a 1080p TV (if possible). You *should* have to get closer with the 720p one before you start seeing the individual pixels, unless the HDTV is a good bit bigger than the SDTV.

And note, this test requires, for best results, that each TV is displaying a signal of the proper resolution for that TV. An SD signal on an HD set will always look grainier than that same SD signal on an SD set (unless it's being up-converted before it gets to the TV), and may skew the results.
 
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