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Saying just "Furry" instead of "the furry fandom" sounds weird to me

B

Bababooey

Guest
Examples:

"Furry to me is—"

"I joined furry because—"

I've been seeing this in many furry interview videos.
This must be the norm. I just think it sounds weird, personally.

This isn't a call to action to say you should stop calling it that, but just my personal opinion.
>3>
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
“Furry to me is...” I can see, if talking at least partly about the content or the vague nebulous idea of what the thing is that we’re all invested in. Same goes for other possible phrases that have similarities to yours, like “I got into furry because...”

I don’t think my instinctive “wait what,” language-wise, when it comes to “I joined furry because...” is much actually about “furry” so much as the word “joined” - something about it just feels like you’re suggesting more organization than a fandom can have.

Actually, a good illustration might be replacing “furry” with “anime.”

“Anime to me is...” would be talking about the (emotional) significance of the content, or the definition of the term (in that different groups/people are more or less restrictive in what they consider to be included), not about fandom as such though at some point fandom can enter into it by shaping the experience of the content.

I’m largely thinking about this with my English major hat on, though, I suspect.
 

BlackDragonAJ89

Bumbling Everyman
It sounds weird because the word "furry" in of itself isn't a noun but an adjective. When you treat an adjective like a noun, it creates some very awkward sounding sentences, as if they feel like incomplete thoughts. You can thank the "Noble Internet Citizens" of places like Something Awful or 4chan for that.
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
It sounds weird because the word "furry" in of itself isn't a noun but an adjective. When you treat an adjective like a noun, it creates some very awkward sounding sentences, as if they feel like incomplete thoughts. You can thank the "Noble Internet Citizens" of places like Something Awful or 4chan for that.
That’s applying prescriptive grammar in a way that contradicts actual common usage, though. Members of furry fandom have been referred to as furries for years - it’s every bit a noun in that context. There’s also arguments for there being uncountable definitions; “furry” as a topic, closer to anthropomorphism than furry fandom in meaning. Both of these are things I saw when I first found and got into fandom some 20-ish years ago.
 

Kurushimii

Depressed Monster
But it's not a fandom, it's a subculture. I don't understand why people call it "the furry fandom" when there's no franchise called "Furry".
(And since people keep bringing this up, no, Zootopia does NOT count because it's called Zootopia, not "furry" and the furry community was around WAY longer.)
 
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quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
But it's not a fandom, it's a subculture. I don't understand why people call it "the furry fandom" when there's no franchise called "Furry".
(And since people keep bringing this up, no, Zootopia does NOT count because it's called Zootopia, not "furry" and the furry community was around WAY longer.)
The “franchise,” if you will, is the overarching concept; the common elements between all or most of furry content. There’s anime, k-pop, and even “boys love” fandoms. I think avid readers of romance novels consider themselves a fandom, as well. None of those are franchises. They’re overarching concepts and/or genres, with varying degrees of broadness, and that describes furry content, as well.

Either way you slice it, furry fandom/subculture becomes a bit of the odd one out, because it has elements of both. I’m not saying you can’t consider it a subculture; I’m saying that “fandom” is not an invalid moniker, either.
 

Keefur

aka Cutter Cat
I normally just say "the Fandom" if I am talking about Furries with another Fur. I also, use the words Fur or Furs when talking about Furries. eg. The Furs from the Fandom went to the con. I don't remember ever referring to the Fandom as just "Furry". To me it is a state of being, as in I enjoy being a Furry. I don't consider the word "Furry" a noun, and have always used it as an adjective. I've been in the Fandom a long while, and I've never heard it used as a noun.
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
I dont see the issue.
Furry is being used here as a noun meaning "a person belonging to the furry fandom"
It's a street term sure, but even so. It is cemented in some way to be this.
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
To me it is a state of being, as in I enjoy being a Furry. I don't consider the word "Furry" a noun, and have always used it as an adjective. I've been in the Fandom a long while, and I've never heard it used as a noun.
You... literally just used it as a noun, though. “I enjoy being a furry,” with the indefinite article, is using “furry” as a noun. Talking about “furries” is using it as a noun.

Are you referring to some other usage where you feel it’s used as an adjective only, that I’m missing, here? I’m genuinely confused by your post, as-is.
 

Keefur

aka Cutter Cat
You... literally just used it as a noun

I enjoy being a Furry (person). The object of the gerund phrase is implied and described by the adjective "Furry". Gerund phrases do act as nouns. Wow... It's been a long time since I had to diagram a sentence.
 

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
I like to use the phrase 'I joined The Furries' in the sense that one might join the service, because I think it sounds funny: "Maybe you should join The Furries...let your imagination go and improve your sex life some."
 
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