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Critique: Shading Critique and advice!!!

WildKitFox

WildKitFox
Hey everyone!

I've been determined to improve my art skills overall, as well as having taken my first steps in the world of digital art. The going has been fairly rough, as my drawings are still very rough. I recently tried shading one of my works, and found myself growing frustrated. I think part of the problem is that my colored line art is still kinda flat on it's own, but I thought I'd post the result of the shading attempt here in the hopes that someone may provide helpful feedback, on not just the shading and color, but the overall drawing. As I said, I'm determined to improve my skills!

Oh, also, the ears are horrible, I decided to try something new, and it didn't work out at all!

The work in question is posted here: www.furaffinity.net: Dancing Pyrrhi Shading attempt by WildKitFox

I appreciate it!
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
I'd recommend grabbing one of these and shining a light on it, then transferring what you see onto whatever medium you use.

(EDIT) Give me a sec, this thing is automatically formatting a link and it's pissing me off

I think this would be the best way to make sure you get lighting as accurate as possible.

(EDIT 2)
41XdwBjHM4L._AC_SY355_.jpg


@Admin: Could someone please make it so I can paste an Amazon store page without it fragging breaking everything? Thanks.
 

WildKitFox

WildKitFox
I'd recommend grabbing one of these and shining a light on it, then transferring what you see onto whatever medium you use.

(EDIT) Give me a sec, this thing is automatically formatting a link and it's pissing me off

I think this would be the best way to make sure you get lighting as accurate as possible.

(EDIT 2)
41XdwBjHM4L._AC_SY355_.jpg


@Admin: Could someone please make it so I can paste an Amazon store page without it fragging breaking everything? Thanks.
That's not a bad idea at all. I thought of picking one up for general pose studies and such, but never really thought of seeing the way light catches. Thanks!
 

Toby_Morpheus

Hello, Proto
That's not a bad idea at all. I thought of picking one up for general pose studies and such, but never really thought of seeing the way light catches. Thanks!
There are ones from Figma (I think) that are blank plastic figures that come with stuff like weapons, too.
 

Vinfang

Indie Game Artist / Telegram: vinfang
i recommend online 3d database / body-kun & body-chan.

the chibi-kun and the little wooden man are fairly useless in my opinion, some toy action figures has far better joints / balance / posing ability. (Bandai's gundam figures need to be assembled, but are pretty reliable and flexible for posing purposes)

as for lighting reference, you can always take a photo first then add a filter later.
 

Olivitree

Local Bizartist
So if your intention is learning, I have some tips.

Most importantly, be patient with yourself, we all have to work up the skill levels and that takes time and repeatedly practising those skills.

I'd suggest finding reference images and keeping them to the side while you're drawing to look at them, its important because we don't just KNOW what something looks like in terms of how to draw it, you could probably describe it with words but getting that memory to drawing link down takes time and practice.

I'd always recommend learning to draw from life as a first step, adding a style in before you've grasped the fundamentals can make it very hard to learn how to make things look good (speaking from experience here).
So I'd say look for some tutorials, use reference images when you're drawing a character, all that good stuff.
 

WildKitFox

WildKitFox
i recommend online 3d database / body-kun & body-chan.

the chibi-kun and the little wooden man are fairly useless in my opinion, some toy action figures has far better joints / balance / posing ability. (Bandai's gundam figures need to be assembled, but are pretty reliable and flexible for posing purposes)

as for lighting reference, you can always take a photo first then add a filter later.
I'll look into the online 3d database! I'm not very familiar with it, so thanks, I'll certainly check those out!

So if your intention is learning, I have some tips.

Most importantly, be patient with yourself, we all have to work up the skill levels and that takes time and repeatedly practising those skills.

I'd suggest finding reference images and keeping them to the side while you're drawing to look at them, its important because we don't just KNOW what something looks like in terms of how to draw it, you could probably describe it with words but getting that memory to drawing link down takes time and practice.

I'd always recommend learning to draw from life as a first step, adding a style in before you've grasped the fundamentals can make it very hard to learn how to make things look good (speaking from experience here).
So I'd say look for some tutorials, use reference images when you're drawing a character, all that good stuff.

Patience is something I think I've struggled with with art for sure. I've gotten better, but I still get really frustrated when I feel like I could be doing better than I am. I'll try to use references more. I will look for something that fits if I'm having a hard time, but never really set out with them at the ready.

Thank you both for the advice!
 
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