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Soooooooo any Linux users out there?

GroovySpaceFox

Well-Known Member
Currently using Ubuntu 20.04 and it works very well for most of the things that I need to do. I have it installed on an SSD and I am amazed at how fast it boots.
 

Zhalo

Rez the Wolfdog
I use Manjaro KDE w/ latte on my desktop, but still have Windows dual booted for games and such. Also have a raspberry pi 4B 2gb with raspbian. Hoping to get a HTPC/NAS server, running a Plex server and Steam cache set up soon. Probably going to run Debian for that.

I really like how I have gotten my desktop to look.
Screenshot_1_Screen-min.png
 
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FunniValentine

Valentine
I mainly use Manjaro KDE, I try to use it for as much as I can. If it wasn't for Easy Anti Cheat not functioning with Proton/Steam Play, it would be my only and primary operating system.
 

Raptoaaah

New Member
I use Linux for my studies and at home in many places like OpenWRT for the router or Ubuntu for some services like home automation, MQTT, cloud hosting and so on. I love KDE and even installed it on a MacBook Air, even though it still can't replace my primary desktop with macOS due to some convenience reasons ;)
Sending just a file between two systems seems to be incredibly complex outside of AirDrop.
 

KairanD

Member
Just switched from Ubuntu 20.10 to Pop!OS 20.10. I'm loving it!

Pop fixes many of Ubuntu's problems and the Pop Shell is amazing!

1614765599471.png


I mainly use Manjaro KDE, I try to use it for as much as I can. If it wasn't for Easy Anti Cheat not functioning with Proton/Steam Play, it would be my only and primary operating system.
Epic Games and their anti-cheat are currently the biggest barrier against the GNU/Linux gaming community.

Ubuntu was my only operating system for a year (now it's Pop!OS). I've accepted that I'm not going to play some games. Totally worth it!
 
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FoxWithAName

New Member
Epic Games and their anti-cheat are currently the biggest barrier against the GNU/Linux gaming community.
So true I want to play Insurgency: Sandstorm on my machine but EAC T_T. Heard of a few articles in gaming on Linux that there is some progress but it went quite more than half a year ago.

I mainly use Manjaro KDE, I try to use it for as much as I can. If it wasn't for Easy Anti Cheat not functioning with Proton/Steam Play, it would be my only and primary operating system.
I can completely understand that.
 

KairanD

Member
So true I want to play Insurgency: Sandstorm on my machine but EAC T_T. Heard of a few articles in gaming on Linux that there is some progress but it went quite more than half a year ago.
Only the community or Valve can solve that. I wouldn't count on any help by Epic Games. Their CEO already made toxic comments against the GNU/Linux community and they're on a battle against Valve: they don't want to see a better Proton and improved Steam consoles.

Epic is one of the worse companies for our community.
 

FoxWithAName

New Member
Epic is one of the worse companies for our community.
And this is such a shame. I don't understand why this anti-posture exist against Valve. I know there are in direct competition, but Epic has made some good statements about decreasing there own cut for fairness. But recently they act more and more as destructive force on the video game market... In my opinion
 

moss235

Member
I've tried a couple distributions but I like Arch best ^^ I use it for my main personal machine and for work. I do a lot of programming and have an engineering kind of personality so I like getting to have a better view into how things work under the hood. Plus it's addicting to always have new updates to install hehe.

On my phone I'm using LineageOS which is a FOSS Google Apps-free distribution of Android. One of my friends just got a PinePhone which runs straight Manjaro and I'm pretty jealous.
 
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KairanD

Member
I do a lot of programming and have an engineering kind of personality so I like getting to have a better view into how things work under the hood.
Arch is the best distribution to really learn how GNU/Linux works. I want to try it someday. For now, I'm addicted to Pop!OS. It's fantastic!

And this is such a shame. I don't understand why this anti-posture exist against Valve. I know there are in direct competition, but Epic has made some good statements about decreasing there own cut for fairness. But recently they act more and more as destructive force on the video game market... In my opinion
Epic became the very thing it promised to fight... It's sad.
 

Parabellum3

I'm not a furry if I have feathers.
I use Ubuntu through VirtualBox primarily for college assignments. Most of the time I play around in the SSH servers.
 

moss235

Member
Arch is the best distribution to really learn how GNU/Linux works. I want to try it someday. For now, I'm addicted to Pop!OS. It's fantastic!
Do you have a System76 laptop? That's what my personal Arch machine is, and it came with Pop originally. I'd be curious to know what are the features you like about it! I probably should have given it a shot before I rudely removed it to install Arch, hehe.
 

KairanD

Member
Do you have a System76 laptop? That's what my personal Arch machine is, and it came with Pop originally. I'd be curious to know what are the features you like about it! I probably should have given it a shot before I rudely removed it to install Arch, hehe.
No, but I would love to! I'm brazilian and System76 is currently not shipping products to Brazil. I could use a shipping service, but the laptops are not worth it when converting the price in US Dollar to Brazilian Real. Maybe in the future... If I was looking for a new laptop, I would buy from Avell, which is a brazilian company that sells laptops very similar to System76's for a cheaper price. They're both using Clevo designs, after all.

I'm running Pop!OS on a custom desktop (i5 4670K, 16GB RAM, GTX 1070Ti, SSD) and on an Asus S46CB laptop (i7 3537U, 8GB RAM, GT 740M, SSD). Let's focus on the undying 7-year-old laptop. I've already used Ubuntu, Kubuntu, ElementaryOS and Manjaro. This thing always ran a lot hotter than it did on Windows and I've always experienced a bad energy management on GNU/Linux, even with TLP installed. But, on Pop, the package customized by System76 is impressive. The laptop is running way cooler and it's extremely easy to change between energy states (and they really work!). The battery life is also better. I also had problems with Ubuntu installing incomplete package drivers for the GT 740M, resulting in a non-functional Nvidia X Server Settings and sometimes a black screen that needed fixing from the terminal after every OS install. On Pop!OS it just works.

Pop also has Flatpak support out-of-the-box and I don't need to add PPAs to install things like Lutris. The software store, that in Ubuntu is extremely slow and frustrating, works flawless on System76's OS. The system is also cleaner, comes with few installed packages and has every data collecting method disabled by default. It also uses Systemd-boot instead of GRUB and I'm experiencing faster boot times. Also, Pop! Shell is amazing and I'm finally using GNOME as it's supposed to. The window tiling feature is a must have for productivity.

Well, a conclusion? Pop!OS seems like a Super Saiyan version of Ubuntu to me (=P). All the benefits, none of the problems! I don't hate Ubuntu... In fact, I love it. But Pop!OS fixes many things and brings an out-of-the-box improved experience for all kinds of users. And it's keeping my old and tough daily laptop alive (this thing suffered a lot during it's life, but seems to be indestructible, lol. Asus did a great job).
 

moss235

Member
No, but I would love to! I'm brazilian and System76 is currently not shipping products to Brazil. I could use a shipping service, but the laptops are not worth it when converting the price in US Dollar to Brazilian Real. Maybe in the future... If I was looking for a new laptop, I would buy from Avell, which is a brazilian company that sells laptops very similar to System76's for a cheaper price. They're both using Clevo designs, after all.
Oh yeah! These do look very similar.
I'm running Pop!OS on a custom desktop (i5 4670K, 16GB RAM, GTX 1070Ti, SSD) and on an Asus S46CB laptop (i7 3537U, 8GB RAM, GT 740M, SSD). Let's focus on the undying 7-year-old laptop. I've already used Ubuntu, Kubuntu, ElementaryOS and Manjaro. This thing always ran a lot hotter than it did on Windows and I've always experienced a bad energy management on GNU/Linux, even with TLP installed. But, on Pop, the package customized by System76 is impressive. The laptop is running way cooler and it's extremely easy to change between energy states (and they really work!). The battery life is also better. I also had problems with Ubuntu installing incomplete package drivers for the GT 740M, resulting in a non-functional Nvidia X Server Settings and sometimes a black screen that needed fixing from the terminal after every OS install. On Pop!OS it just works.
That's great! Arch also has a System76-provided AUR package for power management, I usually keep the graphics card off when I'm just programming and easily get 5+ hours of battery life.
Pop also has Flatpak support out-of-the-box and I don't need to add PPAs to install things like Lutris. The software store, that in Ubuntu is extremely slow and frustrating, works flawless on System76's OS. The system is also cleaner, comes with few installed packages and has every data collecting method disabled by default. It also uses Systemd-boot instead of GRUB and I'm experiencing faster boot times. Also, Pop! Shell is amazing and I'm finally using GNOME as it's supposed to. The window tiling feature is a must have for productivity.
I've been using GRUB for both my installs, maybe I should check out systemd-boot. I know that's what the AUR installer uses. And also just saw on HackerNews this morning that GRUB has several newly discovered security vulnerabilities. I didn't know GNOME can do window tiling! I am used to i3 and will probably move to sway soon since Wayland is getting better and better these days.
Well, a conclusion? Pop!OS seems like a Super Saiyan version of Ubuntu to me (=P). All the benefits, none of the problems! I don't hate Ubuntu... In fact, I love it. But Pop!OS fixes many things and brings an out-of-the-box improved experience for all kinds of users. And it's keeping my old and tough daily laptop alive (this thing suffered a lot during it's life, but seems to be indestructible, lol. Asus did a great job).
That's great to hear ^^
 

KairanD

Member
That's great! Arch also has a System76-provided AUR package for power management, I usually keep the graphics card off when I'm just programming and easily get 5+ hours of battery life.
I keep the Nvidia driver on hybrid mode, using the Intel HD Graphics as primary. The GT 740M is rarely used. I would like to disable it, but there's no option in the BIOS.

I've been using GRUB for both my installs, maybe I should check out systemd-boot. I know that's what the AUR installer uses. And also just saw on HackerNews this morning that GRUB has several newly discovered security vulnerabilities. I didn't know GNOME can do window tiling! I am used to i3 and will probably move to sway soon since Wayland is getting better and better these days.
Systemd-boot is gradually improving to replace GRUB. It's faster, more reliable and more secure. However, it has some bugs, since it's very recent. Only few distros are using it as default. The ones more focused on stability, like Debian and even Ubuntu, are probably going to keep GRUB for a while. Arch and Pop!OS are pulling ahead.

The windows tiling feature is provided by System76's Pop Shell extension. It works really well!

I'm also waiting for improvements for Wayland, since... Well, Nvidia. You know.
 
I'm running a AMD Ryzen 5 2600 with Linux Mint 19.3
I have 16gb of DDR4 RAM Displaying with a GTX 1050 Ti graphics card
I run other operating systems with virtualbox

I am interested in getting another PS4 just to install Linux on it to see how well it runs Steam.
And who knows, it might be a travel PC to take with me at furry conventions.
But PS4s are scarce in my region.
 

hirumono

New Member
Been using many Linux flavors since about 2007. I settled on Ubuntu for a while, until the Amazon search thing came out - disgusted, I had a look around and found a good alternative in Linux Mint, which I've been using till today.
My setup is nothing fancy, a 4th-gen i5 with 16 GB Ram and Geforce GTX970. I rarely run games on it so it's more than enough.
Every now and then I experiment with VirtualBox to try out a release of Win 10 or AndroidX86 (still hoping for a port of Bluestacks in the future!).
 

contemplationistwolf

The Restless Maverick
I used to use Linux as my main operating system 5 or more years ago. I mainly used Linux Mint, though sometimes Ubuntu as well. 'apt-get' and the solid terminal were really convenient, especially for software development. If I, say, quickly wanted to start developing parallel applications with Spark, I could easily just install the necessary tools through terminal and start developing with the exact same Text Editor + Terminal combo I use for everything else. In windows, I'd generally have to install some new (and usually cumbersome) GUI application.

It did have problems though. The biggest issue for me personally was hardware support. Most vendors develop the drivers and software support for their hardware only for windows, so getting the peripherals (like surround headsets and gaming mice) working properly was a much bigger hassle, and it usually still ended up having missing features compared with Windows. The biggest problem though was GPU and battery management. I had to manually switch between my Nvidia GTX 880m GPU and the integrated one, and while I could easily do hours of gaming on windows on battery, I could do barely 15 mins on Linux. The battery lasted way shorter on Linux in general.

The other big problem was gaming. The majority of games are made just for Windows, and while Wine allows to play most of them on Linux as well, it's usually a hassle and oftentimes ends up with problems and missing features. I think I had multiplayer problems with one game, and with another the game had messed up UI in some places, and missing cutscenes.

When Windows 10 came around, it provided linux tools for its own filesystem and workspaces, so at that point I had little reason to go back. These days, when I need Linux functionality I just use Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). It allows me to conveniently use most Linux tools on my Windows filesystem (oh and that's why I use WSL1 over WSL2, the latter apparently isn't meant to be used on Windows filesystem). If I need full Linux functionality, I will just use a virtual machine.
 

moss235

Member
Yeah, if you want to use these things which are basically designed for vendor lock-in you eventually end up dual booting or using WSL. I went the dual booting route. I try to minimize my time in Windows because of all the anti features (Cortana, telemetry, etc.) but it can be an exhausting dance. I hear Wine is improving a lot lately, so that's at least some good news.
 
I used to use Linux as my main operating system 5 or more years ago. I mainly used Linux Mint, though sometimes Ubuntu as well. 'apt-get' and the solid terminal were really convenient, especially for software development. If I, say, quickly wanted to start developing parallel applications with Spark, I could easily just install the necessary tools through terminal and start developing with the exact same Text Editor + Terminal combo I use for everything else. In windows, I'd generally have to install some new (and usually cumbersome) GUI application.

It did have problems though. The biggest issue for me personally was hardware support. Most vendors develop the drivers and software support for their hardware only for windows, so getting the peripherals (like surround headsets and gaming mice) working properly was a much bigger hassle, and it usually still ended up having missing features compared with Windows. The biggest problem though was GPU and battery management. I had to manually switch between my Nvidia GTX 880m GPU and the integrated one, and while I could easily do hours of gaming on windows on battery, I could do barely 15 mins on Linux. The battery lasted way shorter on Linux in general.

The other big problem was gaming. The majority of games are made just for Windows, and while Wine allows to play most of them on Linux as well, it's usually a hassle and oftentimes ends up with problems and missing features. I think I had multiplayer problems with one game, and with another the game had messed up UI in some places, and missing cutscenes.

When Windows 10 came around, it provided linux tools for its own filesystem and workspaces, so at that point I had little reason to go back. These days, when I need Linux functionality I just use Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). It allows me to conveniently use most Linux tools on my Windows filesystem (oh and that's why I use WSL1 over WSL2, the latter apparently isn't meant to be used on Windows filesystem). If I need full Linux functionality, I will just use a virtual machine.
I wouldn't recommend Windows 10. The OS has so many back doors that if you knew what all of them do, you would be too scared to do anything online with it.
I've heard so many horror stories and seen so many videos of Windows 10 users being hacked, hijacked framed, defrauded and even removed from the internet permanently. All because they clicked on the wrong link, said a phrase someone didn't like, or won too many games and gloated about it.
You are not safe with Windows 10 unless you are operating your computer offline. Doesn't matter what kind of security software you have, someone will always find a way through.
 

contemplationistwolf

The Restless Maverick
I wouldn't recommend Windows 10. The OS has so many back doors that if you knew what all of them do, you would be too scared to do anything online with it.
I've heard so many horror stories and seen so many videos of Windows 10 users being hacked, hijacked framed, defrauded and even removed from the internet permanently. All because they clicked on the wrong link, said a phrase someone didn't like, or won too many games and gloated about it.
You are not safe with Windows 10 unless you are operating your computer offline. Doesn't matter what kind of security software you have, someone will always find a way through.
That's interesting. Are there any specific backdoors that are of concern? I do admit I'm somewhat lazy on security as I trust that I won't do anything too stupid and that I'm not much of a target either.
 
That's interesting. Are there any specific backdoors that are of concern? I do admit I'm somewhat lazy on security as I trust that I won't do anything too stupid and that I'm not much of a target either.
There are 117 back doors into Windows 10 and only a handful are closable without crashing internet access. If you close too many doors, Windows 10 will detect it and shut off your internet access. One of the back doors that are well known is the INTELME back door. Most of them are telemetry ports, update ports, location tracing ports, meta data ports and webpage remote viewing ports.
Youtube tutorials will help you out on securing your computer.
 
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