• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Survey - The Structure of the Fandom

Yakamaru

Autumn wolf
The people who expect a group to agree with them just because they share an interest are usually the people who are the least educated and/or open minded on a given topic since they rely on others to tell them what to do, where to go, and who to sleep with at night.

In short: I agree. It's foolish to base your morals or values on a group. That isn't a community. It's a Cult. Confusing the two can be rather dangerous sometimes.

That said, I do think that Furries can form an overarching group or "community" at conventions and in forums such as this. Especially when a goal is perceived, such as raising money for a shelter or helping FA stay up through donations.

There is not an inherent evil associated with the term community for me, but that's because I define it as what it is, and not what people can associate with.
I'm liking you more and more. xD

I don't find the term evil or negative either, and it have its uses for sure, though it should be applied when it actually fits. I prefer to use correct definitions and words to describe something so as to leave as little room for miscommunication and/or misunderstanding as possible. Words are the only things we have for communicating with one another after all, and as such it's important to use direct and distinct language to convey one's thoughts and emotions properly.
 

ben909

character has returned
da was not on list... there was some furry stuff there... but they broke their site so its good they are not included
 

Raever

Chaotic Neutral Wreckage
I prefer to use correct definitions and words to describe something so as to leave as little room for miscommunication and/or misunderstanding as possible

I can certainly agree with that, but I can't help but feel that as a people with a common interest furries get a lot of scorn and hate from those who don't involve themselves with the interest to understand it. As such, furries only tend to find acceptance from other furries (outside of the few outside the interest who accept it naturally,).

That in and of itself can be seen as a community for those who share at least a few interests and goals, but I agree that it is a bit subjective. As it also relies on where you feel you fit in the Fandom and how you interact with others.
 

Yakamaru

Autumn wolf
I can certainly agree with that, but I can't help but feel that as a people with a common interest furries get a lot of scorn and hate from those who don't involve themselves with the interest to understand it. As such, furries only tend to find acceptance from other furries (outside of the few outside the interest who accept it naturally,).

That in and of itself can be seen as a community for those who share at least a few interests and goals, but I agree that it is a bit subjective. As it also relies on where you feel you fit in the Fandom and how you interact with others.
Aye. Furries do get a lot of scorn and hate. Either be it from ignorance or from people who actually knows what's going on in the fandom and decide to judge the fandom as a whole due to all the bad apples in it, or it's trolls messing around to see if they can get a reaction out of people. A part of the problem is this "coming out" culture which is completely alien to me. Why would you want to "come out" about something that is meant to be private and that don't actually affect anyone else? Chances are people don't care and/or don't want to know in the first place. I don't want to hear about it as it don't affect me. I will however ask if I am curious.

And ye. It depends on the individual. A lot of Furries lack social skills and it shows. When you observe thousands upon thousands of people from a distance this become clear as day. And is arguably another part of the wider social issues that Furries face, this one being a lack of self-awareness. Would be nice if people became aware of the concept of metacognition, or thinking about one's own thinking/thought patterns.

The fandom have a lot of social issues that won't be solved anytime soon.
 

Raever

Chaotic Neutral Wreckage
A part of the problem is this "coming out" culture which is completely alien to me.

Same here. I don't agree with "coming out" in any context when it's about a fandom or a hobby. It makes literally no sense unless you're doing it as a joke. Which can be insulting to those who - for example, - are apart of the LGBTQ+; where those people coming out can affect their lives and their loved ones.

But we're getting off topic.

As said before, people mistake fandom for identity and that can be rather ignorant. I think that the creativity and anonymity of the Furry label can provide quite a bit for someone in various ways, but I don't think that makes it an identifying factor such as being Gay or following a spiritual belief.

The fandom have a lot of social issues that won't be solved anytime soon.

I wouldn't necessarily blame the Fandom itself, but rather I feel certain fandoms are more prone to attracting certain types of individuals. The Furry Fandom due to it's anonymous atmosphere and creatively engaging spaces can attract a lot of folks who are on the spectrum. I don't see this as a bad thing, but as a fact. As such, many will not be what is considered by society as "normal" in how they approach others. Sometimes in public, but even much less so online. I don't consider this a flaw, either. It just is what is is, and there's no use shaming people for that.

That said, anonymity also attracts trolls and people who simply don't care how they look to others. I feel in cases like that, it's not because they lack social skills, but because they lack respect for themselves and other people. Which is an entirely different problem altogether that is nigh unsolvable unless that particular person wants to change.

I don't think the overall Fandom is like this, though. Many people who can socially interact and hold intelligent conversation tend to be quieter than the louder, more boisterous folks. Those who do put themselves out there are in the minority, but become heavily respected quickly due to their ability to communicate. Often they'll also give to the Fandom members rather than judge it.

In the end, much like day to day life, you have to ignore the people who you don't want to surround yourself with and appreciate those that you do wish to make some form of connection with. It's not that hard to figure out a balance, but it can be a daunting task in such a large fandom with so many subcategories.
 

Attaman

"I say we forget this business and run."
I'll point out that the "coming out" culture has significantly decreased in the last decade and a half, and I speak as somebody who has self-admitted to joining FAF in part to riff on said culture at that time.

The community has grown significantly more mellow on the matter, likely in no small part because its perception on line has also improved. Likewise online spaces have become slightly less defined by fandom / hobby affiliation compared to where they were back then too. For another - similar - point of comparison, look at how most of the people keeping the console wars alive are a tad bit older than GenZ, and even they are fewer in number.

Usually if there is a coming out post, it's by either:
1) A troll who hasn't updated their playbook in the last ten years. Or, alternatively, was handed down a playbook that hasn't been updated in ten years.
2) Somebody who's talking about a more serious issue, like "My significant other is one of those people who likes to use certain online hobby communities as punching bags and - whoops - turns out I'm one of said hobby communities and now I need to figure out if it's worth trying to correct them / come clean, to just keep it under wraps, or rip go bye-bye / tell them to sod off".
3) Somebody still young enough to not understand that hobby and / or spirituality (in the case of Otherkin, Therians, etcetera), while a part of your identity, generally aren't the sum of it. And that while it's good to not need to have to hide aspects of yourself (even better to be able to be open about it), it's significantly unlikely to come up unless prompted and far lower on the "Need to make immediate friends and family aware" list than they think (unless it ties back into #2 without them consciously realizing, or it ties into LGBTQ+ stuff and Furry is really only being included because "Might as well rip all the bandaids off at once").
 
Top