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The Canadian Accent

Adelio Altomar

Rat-Sized Superiority Complex
Probably one of my stupider threads but here goes:

So how does a Canadian accent sound like?
I have heard maybe one or two recordings of English spoken with Canadian accent, one really Québécois and the other I long ago remember hearing from those Mounties from one episode of 'That 70's Show' wear the guystravel to Canada to get some beer cheaper.

So my question is what does the Canadian accent sound like natively? I meaning as in those who speak English? Is it any different from the Standard American accent? Any recordings you're willing to provide me are definitely wanted. :p

Thanks,

Adelio
 

Shatter

New Member
As far as I can tell, it sounds American, but throwing in bizarre made-up words such as "Aboot".
 

BlackWolfe

New Member
So my question is what does the Canadian accent sound like natively? I meaning as in those who speak English? Is it any different from the Standard American accent? Any recordings you're willing to provide me are definitely wanted. :p

It sounds like Michael J. Fox, who is one of many Canadian actors to move to America to start acting. Sort of a northern midwest-y accent.

Funnily enough, that means *I* sound Canadian despite having never been there.
 

Get-dancing

Member
Americans twang their words, Canadians don't. Canadians stetch their "O's" and "A's", Americans don't.
 

Taekel

Typo Queen.
Ah yes, I loooove (see?) to stretch my words. And, I live in Canada!
Other than what's already been said, I think we talk prettymuch like an American.
:3
 

Kanin

B is for Bull****
It depend on what area in Canada they are from.
 

Kaiit

Member
I honestly couldn't tell the difference between American and Canadian accents when I was in Canada... except ONE person who stuck "eh?" on the end of every sentance... But I never heard anyone talk in the stereotypical accent o.o
 

Adelio Altomar

Rat-Sized Superiority Complex
It depend on what area in Canada they are from.

I figured as much. I wanted to ask this specific point but I wasn't sure if that was a good question or not. What do the regional dialects sound like and how do they vary then?

I love how you call it American. we sound a little more like a English-American mix.
I thought that one guy from that show sound like such.
Actually, I described it to one friend as sounding a like a normal accent with a lightly musical, or Gaelic quality to it, based off that one guy I heard.
Oh, and he said the stereotypical "eh?" at the end of each sentence, eh? :D
 
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Kanin

B is for Bull****
I don't call it american, just because there are so many different accents.
 

Tryp

Some dry white toast please
The stereotypical Canadian accent (think Bob and Doug Mackenzie) doesn't really exist.
I've never heard anyone say "aboot", but I have heard "aboat".

As Get-dancing said, we have something called the "Canadian low back vowel merger" (yes, that's a real term). Canadian English used to be the only English in the world where people pronounced pairs of words like caught and cot, route and root, chock and chalk, not and naught, and taught and tot the same way. Americans in some of the northern states are staring to adopt this pronunciation as well.

Read Chapter 4 of "How to be a Canadian" by Will and Ian Ferguson for more information, you hoser!
 

PaulShepherd

Hawt Dawg
I would rather put both the American and Canadian accents in one group (North American accent), because they don't sound that different and how both sides pronounce words is extremely similar.
 

Carenath

Cynical Dragon
I quite like the Canadian accent, though I have only been to one part of Canada so far.
 

Aurali

Banned
Banned
I think Canada is too stretched out to have one accent.. I'm sure that Newf sounds completely different then wolf-bone. and they both sound different from someone from BC or Quebec.
And people say an American can't know geography.
 

WolvesSoulZ

Member
There difference in accent everywere(though minime), each city (mostly different word, but still)
I am canadian, but living in quebec, my main language is cad-french, and just to compare, our accent in my city is way different then in other city + we got many word other doesn't even know what it mean x3
 

Rehka

Lab Mouse Extraordinar
About "aboot", its not so much that we pronounce it "aboot" its more that we underpronounce the 'u' sound (to me, americans say 'abowt' perhaps over pronouncing the 'u' sound, atleast to my ear)

But yeah there are definitely regional dialects, those in the Maritime provinces definitely speak with a different accent then we in the west...
 

ToeClaws

PEBKAC exterminator
Heh - depends on where you're from in Canada. But also depends where you're going. When I lived in Texas for a while, they thought I had an accent, 'cause compared to the west-Texas drawl, I did. If you're a Canadian from Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta or BC and went to the northern US states, you sound pretty much the same (except for the New York area were they have a thick accent).

Any French Canadians (mostly in Quebec and surrounding regions) have a distinctive French-Canadian accent, and in the eastern Atlantic provinces, there's another very distinct accent largely borne of the strong Irish and Scottish ancestry there.

But what the accent is will always depend on your concept of "normal". If you live in West Texas and speak with a massive southern drawl, then any Canadian accent will sound pretty alien, heh.
 

Rehka

Lab Mouse Extraordinar
The Maritimes are the most eastern provinces, the provinces bordering against the Atlantic Ocean... At least that's how I understand it to be (though I've heard, though Newfoundland is on the Atlantic, they don't consider themselves part of the Maritimes... Perhaps someone from that area can clarify? I've only been as far east as Winnipeg :p )
 

Tryp

Some dry white toast please
The Maritimes are the most eastern provinces, the provinces bordering against the Atlantic Ocean... At least that's how I understand it to be (though I've heard, though Newfoundland is on the Atlantic, they don't consider themselves part of the Maritimes... Perhaps someone from that area can clarify? I've only been as far east as Winnipeg :p )
Newfies like to feel special, so they say they're not part of the Maritimes. I suppose by definition they're not, because they're half an hour ahead of Atlantic time.
 
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