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Things That You Hate v3.0

Outré

(o͞o-trā′)
I hate having to pee, but not bad enough that I have the motivation to get up and go to do it… and then I just end up sitting there for hours being frustrated.
 

Fcomega121

Friendly Maned Wolf + Phoenix
Waiting hours just standing there ignored by your own (first)boyfriend, until I get only 1 message every 2 or 4 hours
 

Fcomega121

Friendly Maned Wolf + Phoenix
I hate OSTANN with all my being UUUGH!

I just hope they get kicked out... these Outrageously Super Temperamental And Noisy Neighbors
 

Fcomega121

Friendly Maned Wolf + Phoenix

Judge Spear

Well-Known Member
FortNite really is for squealing pigs...

FEWc7sVXIAAFJG3.png
 

Lexiand

Werewolf
Minecraft PVP and its community.
 

Raever

Chaotic Neutral Wreckage
It'd be nice to be able to afford a place to live without having to invest thousands of dollars into a degree or rent a flat with four other people to have pocket change for myself. *grumbles in adult*
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
It's been years since I actually had to do any formal tests.

I'm one of those weirdos who prefers to write the answer. Multiple choice can increase the risk that I'll second-guess myself. Also, multiple choice rarely allows for partial credit or alternative, yet potentially correct, answers.


Incidentally, I used to assist teenagers studying for science qualifications, and the British mark schemes often awarded partial credits for incorrect statements that happened to be commonly believed by the British public.

e.g. A teenager who wrote that phone signals cause cancers would be awarded additional points, even though this isn't true.

Drove me nuts.
 

Filter

ɹǝʇlᴉℲ
Incidentally, I used to assist teenagers studying for science qualifications, and the British mark schemes often awarded partial credits for incorrect statements that happened to be commonly believed by the British public.

e.g. A teenager who wrote that phone signals cause cancers would be awarded additional points, even though this isn't true.

Drove me nuts.

That's unsettling. Sounds political.
 

Kellan Meig'h

Kilted Luthier
I'm one of those weirdos who prefers to write the answer. Multiple choice can increase the risk that I'll second-guess myself. Also, multiple choice rarely allows for partial credit or alternative, yet potentially correct, answers.
I took the ASE (automotive Service Excellence) tests for Automotive HVAC, Bodywork and Painting and a few others without ever studying the subjects, passed all of them with a 90% or better. Multiple choice will have two answers that are totally wrong, one that might be right and one that is right but may be written obtusely. Find the two wrongs, then the almost right answer. That leaves the correct answer with better than 85% accuracy, according to a college professor I knew. BTW, he gave out essay tests.

Moral of that story; went with five other instructors of a now-defunct automotive institute to get certified in my areas of expertise, transmissions and smog emissions. Came away with a ASE Master Technician rating. The director hated that because it meant he had to raise my pay 10%, it was in my employment agreement. There were two more Masters there but they had the rating before becoming instructors.

Also, never sell your small, family owned automotive institute to a big concern (Corinthian Colleges) that made huge promises. Was gone in a few years, shut down and broke up to pay off some of CC's debt.
 

Filter

ɹǝʇlᴉℲ
I took the ASE (automotive Service Excellence) tests for Automotive HVAC, Bodywork and Painting and a few others without ever studying the subjects, passed all of them with a 90% or better. Multiple choice will have two answers that are totally wrong, one that might be right and one that is right but may be written obtusely. Find the two wrongs, then the almost right answer. That leaves the correct answer with better than 85% accuracy, according to a college professor I knew. BTW, he gave out essay tests.
Gaming multiple choice exams is part of the problem, in my opinion. Something that can come back to bite you later, if you haven't learned the material well enough. They don't necessarily demonstrate the extent of your knowledge. At least not as well as short answers and essays do.

This reminds me of a test-taking method described by one of my old high school teachers: Hold up for fingers, and then whack them on the edge of your desk. The finger that hurts the most is the correct answer. It was obviously a joke, but 1 in 4 is better odds than somebody correctly answering an essay or fill-in-the-blank question without actually knowing the answer.

Trick answers can be included to make multiple choice more difficult, but that doesn't necessarily help if you're prone to overthinking. Especially when there are multiple viable competing theories. Maybe the teacher is a flat-earther, for instance, and you need to consider that before selecting "B" rather than "C". At least written answers let you plead your case. Plus, if you only earn partial credit, you should have a better sense of where your knowledge is lacking, or that you didn't arrive at the answer the teacher wants, and what you can do to improve your performance on subsequent exams.
 

Ennui Elemental

Eat shit and die, tankie assholes
Banned
Gaming multiple choice exams is part of the problem, in my opinion. Something that can come back to bite you later, if you haven't learned the material well enough. They don't necessarily demonstrate the extent of your knowledge. At least not as well as short answers and essays do.

This reminds me of a test-taking method described by one of my old high school teachers: Hold up for fingers, and then whack them on the edge of your desk. The finger that hurts the most is the correct answer. It was obviously a joke, but 1 in 4 is better odds than somebody correctly answering an essay or fill-in-the-blank question without actually knowing the answer.

Trick answers can be included to make multiple choice more difficult, but that doesn't necessarily help if you're prone to overthinking. Especially when there are multiple viable competing theories. Maybe the teacher is a flat-earther, for instance, and you need to consider that before selecting "B" rather than "C". At least written answers let you plead your case. Plus, if you only earn partial credit, you should have a better sense of where your knowledge is lacking, or that you didn't arrive at the answer the teacher wants, and what you can do to improve your performance on subsequent exams.
I prefer write in tests for this reason. I already deal with situations I was not sufficiently trained or tested for, this only gets worse when it's something that requires really specific knowledge.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
That's unsettling. Sounds political.

If I was going to make a generous interpretation, the examiners might have decided that they didn't want to penalise candidates for believing in widely-accepted 'general knowledge' that isn't quite true- especially since it's the kind of thing misinformed parents or teachers who are trying to be helpful might tell students.

I have no idea why they were doing it though.
 
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