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Things you never learned in school

Unsilenced

Mentlegen
Glorious Private School Master Race here. Feels good having been taught personal finances, sex ed, and how to use a MIG welder.

Also I live in California, so our U.S history class was basically "Why White People Ruin Everything, Pt. 1"

Dunno what they taught 'yall for 4 years.
 

Maelstrom Eyre

Ahmoua Wolf
My parents tried forcing me to attend a private school. So I failed every class until they put me back in my public school.

I really didn't like private schools lol...

I almost attended a private Catholic high school, when I was having a rough time my freshman year and it appeared I might fail a couple of classes. My parents didn't want me to have to repeat the grade at my current school (it was a small school, so anyone who had to be "held back" a year was instantly tagged as a moron by teacher and peers, and never allowed to live it down.

Fortunately, I did make it through and stayed in the public school - even though I was Catholic growing up (by association only), I had zero interest in the religion and I would have hated being forced to participate in churchy stuff every day.
 

Astrium

King of the Noodles
Glorious Private School Master Race here. Feels good having been taught personal finances, sex ed, and how to use a MIG welder.

Also I live in California, so our U.S history class was basically "Why White People Ruin Everything, Pt. 1"

Dunno what they taught 'yall for 4 years.

I learned how to weld at my school, which is public. I have yet to receive a personal finance or sex ed class. (Although the Internet has basically covered one of those things, and to give you a hint which one, I still don't know how to balance a checkbook).
 

Chitrakya

New Member
I just finished school and I'm amazed at how much life stuff, like how to apply for a job or take care of yourself as a young adult they never taught us in school. They teach you all this silly junk you don't need and eventually forget, but nothing related to how to care for yourself, make the right decisions and, solve problems, make money etc.
Another thing i never learned in school is how to read a clock. When I asked the teacher's sincere help, they all laughed at me and never asked for help again.
 

Ikrit

I'm fired up!
I almost attended a private Catholic high school, when I was having a rough time my freshman year and it appeared I might fail a couple of classes. My parents didn't want me to have to repeat the grade at my current school (it was a small school, so anyone who had to be "held back" a year was instantly tagged as a moron by teacher and peers, and never allowed to live it down.

Fortunately, I did make it through and stayed in the public school - even though I was Catholic growing up (by association only), I had zero interest in the religion and I would have hated being forced to participate in churchy stuff every day.

went to a Catholic school
forced to dress up every Wednesday
go to the church area
forced to sing kids song the entire damn time
"IF YOU'RE HAPPY AND YOU KNOW IT CLAP YOUR HANDS!"

thank you hurricane Katrina for saving me
 

Astrium

King of the Noodles
I just finished school and I'm amazed at how much life stuff, like how to apply for a job or take care of yourself as a young adult they never taught us in school. They teach you all this silly junk you don't need and eventually forget, but nothing related to how to care for yourself, make the right decisions and, solve problems, make money etc.
Another thing i never learned in school is how to read a clock. When I asked the teacher's sincere help, they all laughed at me and never asked for help again.

Wait, you mean you actually don't know how to read an analog clock?
 

Saiko

GTWT Survivor
(Although the Internet has basically covered one of those things, and to give you a hint which one, I still don't know how to balance a checkbook).

To be fair, online banking has basically made balancing a check book obsolete. The whole point of it is to manually record your transactions, so you don't have to go to the bank to get your account balance. Now you can just log into a website and see everything.
 

Chitrakya

New Member
Hardly. When asked I always start counting the lines in between and mess everything up. I need like 1 minute to read it, it just doesn't come naturally to me.
 
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Maelstrom Eyre

Ahmoua Wolf
I just finished school and I'm amazed at how much life stuff, like how to apply for a job or take care of yourself as a young adult they never taught us in school. They teach you all this silly junk you don't need and eventually forget, but nothing related to how to care for yourself, make the right decisions and, solve problems, make money etc.
Another thing i never learned in school is how to read a clock. When I asked the teacher's sincere help, they all laughed at me and never asked for help again.

There are some life skills. . .like making good choices and solving problems. . .that are not really things that schools should be held responsible for teaching. Not all home situations are full of good examples to follow, and I understand that, but it doesn't mean that it should be added to curriculums.

I wish more schools, in their sex education and health classes, would emphasize the fact that having children is a choice, not an obligation. When I was in school, we were always talked to in terms of "when you have children." It was just an expectation. And they talked about the "science" of it. . .the changes a fertilized egg goes through, and the vague warning "don't have sex because you could end up with a baby or an STD." But the things like the cost of raising kids (which is HUGE) was never brought up. The fact that you will not know a moment's peace, you will have to deal with screaming infants and toddler tantrums and all kinds of other things that are not "cute" or "fun."

I only say this because I am childfree (by choice) and I think more teens and young adults are led to believe that they are expected to reproduce even if they're not sure they WANT kids. No one tells them "you are allowed to not have kids. You are allowed to go against the life-script and NOT have kids. . .you are allowed to have a good career, to earn a good living, to contribute positive things to your community and the world around you, and it doesn't have to include reproducing your DNA.

Resumes, job searching, interviewing - yes, I do think that these are important topics. It's not like most high school graduates are going to have much of a resume to write in the first place, and there are many online resources available, but just getting into the habit of writing, updating, and submitting a formal resume, and learning appropriate behavior when following up on a job inquiry, going to an interview, accepting or declining a job - they are all things that it helps to know and practice. I currently work for a company where, occasionally, I get wayward calls from younger job applicants cursing me out because they didn't get an entry-level job at one of the retail locations, demanding to speak to HR to find out why.

Even better, I get calls from PARENTS demanding to know why their special snowflake didn't get a job.

THEY are the reason why I support high schools teaching these basic skills. No, you are not OWED a job just because you filled out an application or sent a resume, NO you should not cuss out people in a business when you don't get the job, and NO you sure as hell should not have your parents come to speak on your behalf in the job interview. Seriously. . .that's just f'd up and weird. Once you are old enough to start applying for jobs, your parents do NOT need to be talking to your employer on your behalf.
 

SolDirix

Pixel fuzz
They never taught me about the battle of Waterloo, although I hear that it is very common knowledge.

They never taught me to think for myself, which I learned how to do on my own, thankfully since I am a delta, yay for me :p.

They never taught me not to be a doormat, had to learn that the hard way -.-.

They never taught me about how fun math could be if applied to game development.

They never taught me that life is better once you get out of highschool.

They never taught me that education =/= job.

They never taught me that it is more worth it to go to community college first to save money and not get into debt. Of course, I was lucky enough not to have that happen to me :D. Guess not doing well in highschool did have it's upside -w-.
 
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MalletFace

The slave of the Jlfksjlfl
Banned
They never taught me about how fun math could be if applied to game development.

I'd expand that to math being fun applied to anything you enjoy.

I hate math classes, but absolutely enjoy physics. The math there is amazing.
My uncle is a carpenter, and he failed his math classes, but he absolutely loves making measurements and dealing with angles.

I'm sure this kind of thing applies to a lot of people. Math classes are just plain awful.
 
P

Phoenix-Kat

Guest
What this "studying" thing actually consisted of. It was just a vague term to me that no one would bother or could explain to me and when told to "go study" I had no idea what I was actually supposed to be doing.

As for actual subjects. I was homeschooled since the fifth grade and my mom didn't know how to teach. Things like chemistry, physics, basic high school stuff I never learned. My mom eventually gave up teaching me. I never dropped out, my mom just bailed out on me. I'm trying to get my GED and hope they have some sort of remedial class in college where I can learn chemistry and physics because I never learned them before. My mom always told me I would never be able to learn them because they were "too hard".

I was always told I had to learn math if I wanted to be a veterinarian, but no one would ever tell me HOW it would be applied. People just expected me to GET things without giving me examples...such as the mystery surrounding the word "study". I felt like an exchange student who did not speak English.
 
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Red_Lion _

Member
Just about everything that matters to me. What I know about music I picked up on my own, what I know about cooking I learned through trial and error and watching other people. Filling out a check, driving a car, critically analyzing books and movies, writing, random trivia about history and literature, all of that is stuff I learned outside of school. I learned how to write a story because I practiced on forums and through RPs. I learned how to speak to different kinds of people by talking to friends and practicing my verbal skills on my peers and I learned a shit ton of other stuff just by looking it up.
 

LazerMaster5

Lost in the Static
Everything that interested me, ranging from music to space, had to be learned about on my own time. Luckily, I learned a lot about space back in middle school Science Olympiad, along with electricity, optics, and teamwork. Too bad normal school never taught you how to work as a team. They just threw everyone together, resulting in many failures. Typically, the largest group you want for a project is 3 people, otherwise there will be at least one useless person on the team.
And school never taught me how to build and take care of computers. I learned all this from the Internet and experimentation.
 

Samandriel Morningstar

The Morningstar
Basically anything I had to learn to be a functioning human being was learned outside of school.
 
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