• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Transition into Digital Art

Arshes Nei

Masticates in Public
The reason it can be more time consuming is that something that is instinctive like turning the page to help with curved lines, or simply holding your paper up to light/flipping the image to check for mistakes..is less learned on digital. It's not that you can't develop this habit, but it takes effort.

I'm sure there's a few stories of people who tried to turn their tablet or even their monitor when sketching/inking digitally.

There's also the brightness of a monitor where black and white is more precise and in your face. When inking or drawing traditionally, we can sketch and ignore slight marks on the paper or aberrations. With the "purity" of the screen what would normally be minor becomes more apparent.

...hmm like you're less likely to concern yourself with dust or fibers on a canvas because you're looking at it far back vs a monitor where those imperfections would be more in your face.
 

WereGrem

New Member
I rather like this thread, reading it has given me a lot of encouragement.

I started with traditional art; good ol' pencil and paper, and canvas and paints for a treat! I then switched to digital (or at least tried to) and very quickly got demoralised, as nothing was as good as my work in painting. Now, I'm not a fabulous artist, far from it - but it was such a significant drop in quality I almost just accepted the idea of "I guess digital isn't for me"

This was a year or so back, using just a mouse for my drawings. I've now got myself a nifty lil' tablet. I still have a lot to learn about going digital; theres plenty of jargon and techniques that confuse me so bad. It took a little bit of practice but I feel I've slowly improved, and can now sometimes achieve things I wouldn't be able to accomplish with traditional artwork.

I often forget this myself, but its a matter of perseverance. I've found myself staring at a blank screen on my pc monitor all ready to be drawn upon, but I can't seem to get things right, but yet I could easily do it if it were a pencil and paper infront of me. In those cases I'll go off, grab myself a cuppa' and come back to it later. Just a matter of getting used to something totally new. I think I do find digital art rather daunting, as there are so many things you can achieve or experiment with! It's hard to sometimes just focus on just picking the digipen/stlyus up and treating it just like a regular pencil and paper



I'm sure there's a few stories of people who tried to turn their tablet or even their monitor when sketching/inking digitally.

Many, many times. Its one habit I cannot break out of from older traditional work. Luckily not trashed monitors ...yet
 

Bittertooth

Member
I started doing digital art (and with no prior experience with traditional) using Chibipaint. It was an oekaki program, simple but competent. It had layers and layering modes, a handful of different brush settings, extreme ease of use, it was perfect for a beginner who wasn't willing to learn to use Photoshop or Gimp. The particular oekaki I was using was on a Pokemon forum. The fact that the program was directly connected to a community drastically boosted my desire to draw and improve. I ended up using the hell out of that oekaki for the next couple of years

Here's 2 years of pictures made with Chibipaint alone, it doesn't include the things I later made with Gimp and Photoshop http://pokekaki.com/user.php?u=130&show=all
The first digital thing I drew that I considered to be an actual piece of artwork was the July 2010 O RLY submission at the bottom, and since then I've been gradually improving using mainly Chibipaint. I don't use Chibipaint anymore these days though, I started using Gimp for most things late 2011 and Photoshop for everything mid 2012.

I also needed the jtablet program to get pressure sensitivity on the oekaki.
 

TopazThunder

Noir Fetishist
I'm still in the beginnings of the transition phase; I suppose it would be more "dabbling" than anything, but hey. It's....pretty rough for me. It feels like drawing with my off hand, if my off hand was a hook and wielded by a tipsy, seasick pirate. So far it's entirely counter-intuitive to everything I've experienced through art thus far. I'm using a stylus and tablet on a desktop and with the programs ArtRage and Sketchbook Pro, by the way. Also, the way my computer desk must be set up oriented with my chair it aggravates an old shoulder injury something fierce, limiting my practice time to 1-2 hour stints before I have to get up and do something else, so that doesn't really help things. Its obvious I need a much better work space before I can seriously devote enough attention to something digital.

I'm not giving up though, its just that getting decent with digital is lower on my priorities than say, mastering another traditional technique or medium; if there were more hours in the day I'd be able to manage it better. Alas, so much media so little time!

I'm sure there's a few stories of people who tried to turn their tablet or even their monitor when sketching/inking digitally.

There's also the brightness of a monitor where black and white is more precise and in your face. When inking or drawing traditionally, we can sketch and ignore slight marks on the paper or aberrations. With the "purity" of the screen what would normally be minor becomes more apparent.

I am actually guilty of doing that, heh. I've been able to more or less make myself stop doing it by now, but occasionally I find myself subconsciously shifting the tablet around still.

I can definitely attest to that; I find myself erasing tiny stray marks when I'm in my drawing programs a lot. Also normally I'm very sensitive to vagaries in texture of the drawing surface, especially since I do a lot of pen and dry media work, so when I'm trying to draw on the tablet and its this smooth, unblemished surface its...weird feeling, to say the least.
 
Top