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Viking Thread

D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
My interest in Norse mythology has lead me to learn a lot about the Vikings, and I wanted to make a thread were we can all learn about them and share our interests.

Share art, historical facts, stories, opinions, photos, and sources.

I'm enthusiastic about the subject, so I'll be participating frequently.

I want to lay down some rules however:

1)No shitposting
2)No fighting
3)No hatefel comments or anything that violates the forum rules


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ben909

its raining
All i know about this is from video games, so my knowledge is almost certainly inaccurate....


can you really say no fighting in a thread about vikings , many of them would be upset
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
A scientific paper about the genetic landscape of the Viking age was published last year, and it had some very interesting findings.

-To 'Viking' was a poly-ethnic phenomenon; Viking-style archaeological finds are often associated with skeletons that have no or very little evidence of Scandinavian DNA.
-The Viking age changed the genetic landscape of Scandinavia more than it changed the rest of Europe. While about 6% of dna in modern Britons is of Norse origin, up to 25% of modern Scandinavian dna is of British islands origin.
-Vikings were more likely to have Black hair than contemporary Scandinavians.
 
Not super into the subject or read up on it but, something I do find cool is their well know swords called "Ulfberht" that was way ahead of it's time.

Apparently this sword used steel similar to the Damascus steel from somewhere in the middle east, and the Vikings probably got hold of it by traveling all the way from the Baltic Sea, through streams and rivers, carrying their boats if needed through a route called Volga trade route over the river by the same name.

Not that many swords has been found wearing the markings and name of Ulfberth, probably only a few hundered were ever made, but these blades were like the high end, top of the shelf swords made that probably only the richest or best warriors ever had.

If you ever dig up an old sword somewhere and it has some cross markings in the steel and VLFBERHT engraved in it , be sure to keep it close.
 
D

Deleted member 132067

Guest
Damn it, now I want to watch Vikings again.

I don't know much about them, but I love their arm bands/bracelets, on which they swear allegiance to their Jarl.
Interesting tidbit about those armrings: If you're wealthy you need a good way to protect your wealth.
Carrying a fair portion of your wealth in the form of a thick, heavy armring made entirely from (mostly silver or bronze) is an effective way to ensure it's safety.
Having a status object is also pretty neat.
The wealth people have literally been carrying on their arms makes swearing on it, let alone gifting it to someone, something very special.
 

the sleepiest kitty

FAF'S #1 shrimp goblin.
Idk much about them, but I did name my new Animal Crossing NH island "Valhalla"
 

ben909

its raining
For the people that know more and probably more accurate things then me,
Is it true that their gods can fall and possibly die in battle unlike other mythologies?
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
For the people that know more and probably more accurate things then me,
Is it true that their gods can fall and possibly die in battle unlike other mythologies?
Though they could be granted youth and health through the consumption of special foods, the gods can and would die before or during Ragnarok. They could fall in battle or fall prey to horrifying tricks, for example, Odin is destined to die at the hands of Fenrir the wolf, and Thor at the hands of Jormangundr. Baldur himself was killed by a mistletoe Loki had planted, which was the only thing that could truly hurt him.
 

ben909

its raining
Though they could be granted youth and health through the consumption of special foods, the gods can and would die before or during Ragnarok. They could fall in battle or fall prey to horrifying tricks, for example, Odin is destined to die at the hands of Fenrir the wolf.
I knew the wolf part

I personally just find it very interesting that their gods can die, and in most other mythologies their gods cannot fully die(from what i know) such as the titans being traped in the endless pit
 
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D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
I knew the wolf part

I personally just find it very interesting that their gods can die, and in most other mythologies their gods cannot fully die(from what i know) such as the titans being traped i the endless pit
My opinion to explain this personally is that the life of a Norse Viking was tough, and a premature death was almost guaranteed. Perhaps the Vikings wanted gods they could relate to, rather than fear, and considering their idea of the perfect afterlife was granted through being killed, it makes sense to have many gods and stories that reflect that.
 

ben909

its raining
My opinion to explain this personally is that the life of a Norse Viking was tough, and a premature death was almost guaranteed. Perhaps the Vikings wanted gods they could relate to, rather than fear, and considering their idea of the perfect afterlife was granted through being killed, it makes sense to have many gods and stories that reflect that.
Makes sense
 

KimberVaile

Officially elected and actual ruler of FAF
Thought @Nexus Cabler might appreciate hearing some of the Viking history I know, so I'll post a bit about a figure I found interesting.

After all, It'd be remiss of me not to mention such an interesting saga of the Vikings, focusing primarily on Ivar the boneless.
Ivar the boneless who was a Viking leader with a condition that made him unable to walk, normally would have been cast out of Viking society for his impediments but was spared due to being the son of the chieftain. Ivar of course, would overcompensate for this with a very cunning mind and was the leader behind one of the most momentous Viking gains during the Viking Age. He was by far the most successful Viking leader during the Norse Invasions of 865. Those faced with the Vikings at the time termed them the "Great Heathen Army".

Ivar's most substantial influence came with the conquest of York. The Vikings with relative ease, storming the walls of York and brutally executing both Ella, Osbhert. (These two were in a civil war for the crown of Northumbria, York being their capital). Both leaders were executed by a method called the Blood Eagle, I'll leave the reader to look up what that is, it's a little to gruesome too describe here. The rest of Northumbria fell soon afterwards.

According to Viking Saga, Ragnar, who had attempted to raid England earlier, was defeated by the Northumbrians and executed by being thrown into a pit of venomous snakes. The last part may be a bit suspect but the rest was likely true. Ivar the Boneless was the son of Ragnar, so target of Northumbria was given precedence via personal motivation.
The capture of York in particular was of great historical significance as this region would stay under Viking influence for centuries, which culturally speaking, is quite noteworthy. The Viking forces would also capture Nottingham from the Mercians during this time.
Ivar's final campaign was waged against the Strathclyde (modern day Scotland) and would end with the Vikings completely razing their capital of Dumbarton. Ivar for his great victories would be known as "king of the Norsemen of all Ireland and Britain,".
 
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D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
A scientific paper about the genetic landscape of the Viking age was published last year, and it had some very interesting findings.

-To 'Viking' was a poly-ethnic phenomenon; Viking-style archaeological finds are often associated with skeletons that have no or very little evidence of Scandinavian DNA.
-The Viking age changed the genetic landscape of Scandinavia more than it changed the rest of Europe. While about 6% of dna in modern Britons is of Norse origin, up to 25% of modern Scandinavian dna is of British islands origin.
-Vikings were more likely to have Black hair than contemporary Scandinavians.
I had to pay to read the article, but the abstract was helpful. Interestingly enough, due to their travels, they had much Southern European heritage too. It would be accurate to say that most people, to this day, have at least one Viking ancestor in their history. A Viking was after all more so of an occupation and culture, than a specific race or people from what we are learning.
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Dark Moon Wolf Bane

Old wolf back again
This is a subject that is very close to me. I have studied Norse mythology for years and practice Asatru. One of my arms is sleeved in Norse tattoos as well. Neil Gaiman's book "Norse Mythology" is a great overview of the stories of the gods and goddesses presented in a fun way. The Eddas and Sagas are good as well.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
This is a subject that is very close to me. I have studied Norse mythology for years and practice Asatru. One of my arms is sleeved in Norse tattoos as well. Neil Gaiman's book "Norse Mythology" is a great overview of the stories of the gods and goddesses presented in a fun way. The Eddas and Sagas are good as well.
I have yet to read the Eddas or Sagas, and I'll also check out Neil Gaiman's book. I also recommend 'The Viking Spirit' by Daniel McCoy, which was incredible and really captures the nature of Norse mythology. I also hear he has a Youtube channel and podcast, and runs a website as well, for quick referencing. Norse Mythology for Smart People - The Ultimate Online Guide to Norse Mythology and Religion (norse-mythology.org)

For Asatru, I have and a book that introduces the subject by Mathas Nordvig, that's helped me understand modern Heathen spirituality very well.

As for the history of Vikings themselves, I've been reading a recently published book 'Children of Ash and Elm', by Neil Price who is a professor archeologist in Sweden. I highly recommend it.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
There are a couple of other papers I remember about this, which show that Iceland and the Faroe islands are a mixed population of Scandinavian and British island origin.

and there's one about the Oseburg ship burial, which finds evidence of genes being exchanged between Scandinavia and the Middle East.

The period prior to the Viking age was associated with an increase in Middle Eastern genes entering Scandinavia. Weapons become more 'Roman' in appearance at this time as well.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
There are a couple of other papers I remember about this, which show that Iceland and the Faroe islands are a mixed population of Scandinavian and British island origin.

and there's one about the Oseburg ship burial, which finds evidence of genes being exchanged between Scandinavia and the Middle East.

The period prior to the Viking age was associated with an increase in Middle Eastern genes entering Scandinavia. Weapons become more 'Roman' in appearance at this time as well.
Not to mention, the Vikings slept with a lot of people on their travels (they really didn't care where they came from as long as they looked good enough), and because it was such a rewarding occupation (If you survived) many people were recruited, and brought with them on ships to sail new lands, and settle in new places, further spreading across the world.
 

Dark Moon Wolf Bane

Old wolf back again
I have yet to read the Eddas or Sagas, and I'll also check out Neil Gaiman's book. I also recommend 'The Viking Spirit' by Daniel McCoy, which was incredible and really captures the nature of Norse mythology. I also hear he has a Youtube channel and podcast, and runs a website as well, for quick referencing. Norse Mythology for Smart People - The Ultimate Online Guide to Norse Mythology and Religion (norse-mythology.org)

For Asatru, I have and a book that introduces the subject by Mathas Nordvig, that's helped me understand modern Heathen spirituality very well.

As for the history of Vikings themselves, I've been reading a recently published book 'Children of Ash and Elm', by Neil Price who is a professor archeologist in Sweden. I highly recommend it.
Thank you, I will check it out. Always love learning more about them.


I was planning to explore the Scandinavian region then COVID hit. I am looking forward to getting to getting to experience the world I have studied so long.
 
D

Deleted member 134556

Guest
I've spent time in Scandinavia but it was mostly further North than the lands where 'vikings' came from.
Where you there for a research project or vacation, and do you have any pictures saved?
 
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