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Wanna Critique me?

*steels self*

I don't often like critique, but I'm taking the plunge, I want to improve.

http://www.furaffinity.info/view/684670/

http://www.furaffinity.info/view/688979/

NSFW:
http://www.furaffinity.info/view/689140/

I thought I'd give more to be critiqued, but I can only stand so much.

Thanks kindly!
(oh, looking for critique on anatomy and colouring, and specific instructions on how to improve would be greatly appreciated)
 
Hey, don't be shy of critique! I'm glad you decided to take the plunge.

I only viewed the two pieces you posted, so I can't speak for the rest of your gallery. The most important thing I would like to tell you is that you should attempt more "three-quarters"-style poses in your work. This translating to the subject standing at a slight angle as opposed to looking directly at the "camera" or "audience" or looking directly to the left or right. Although this full frontal and sideways views may feel more comfortable to the budding artist, I've always felt that they are much more difficult to pull off (on the whole). There are some 3/4 elements in the second picture you listed, and this adds to the depth and over-all belief of the scene.

I hope this exercise will aid you in the future :3
 
Yves-Alphonse said:
Hey, don't be shy of critique! I'm glad you decided to take the plunge.

I only viewed the two pieces you posted, so I can't speak for the rest of your gallery. The most important thing I would like to tell you is that you should attempt more "three-quarters"-style poses in your work. This translating to the subject standing at a slight angle as opposed to looking directly at the "camera" or "audience" or looking directly to the left or right. Although this full frontal and sideways views may feel more comfortable to the budding artist, I've always felt that they are much more difficult to pull off (on the whole). There are some 3/4 elements in the second picture you listed, and this adds to the depth and over-all belief of the scene.

I hope this exercise will aid you in the future :3

I don't know *quite* what you mean...do you mean, like, turning the head or body slightly this way or that as opposed to the full on view?

thank you for the advice though, i'll keep that in mind ^.=.^
 
That's right-- simply having the subject facing halfway between the front and the side. Allow me to paint a visual picture:

You're standing in a square room with your back against the wall. There's a furrie at the front of you. Instead of telling him or her to face you directly, or to face a wall at his or her right/left, you have them face the corner of the room.

Thus, instead of seeing the front of their body only (1/1), or seeing the side of their body only (1/2), you see something in between (3/4).

I hope I didn't confuse you with the fractions-- if you'd like them explained more deeply I can do that, but their purpose is only to name the position. If you recognize what positions I mean, then you may call them whatever you wish. The fractions are irrelevant afterwards.

----------

Ha! you've added another picture since I responded. Rehka. Yes, this picture is closer to my meaning-- it can be recognized that the chest and head are at a slight angle giving them depth. As we reach the lower body, there are several conflicting body parts. . .

•Both legs are facing directly to our left. Between the legs and torso this is alright.
•The tail is aligned with the spine, as it should be. It is strange, however for the tail to be facing directly to the right, as it is protruding from behind the body at the 3/4 angle. This, however, is not completely unnatural, so we will leave it.
•Our problem arises when we see the legs and tail together. The legs force the hips to be turned sideways, while the tail forces the hips to remain (like the torso) at a 3/4 angle. My suggestion would be to angle the leg closest to us down ever-so-slightly and try to make it appear as though it were coming toward the viewer (a difficult task, I know!)

Other than that, there's a small discrepancy in the back/farther leg. It emerges from the body too low and far. Remember that the top of the leg is actually the buttocks. Try to raise the back leg a little, and extend the knee so the angle isn't as harsh (and therefore appears more natural as it is an easier position to maintain).

Happy drawing! :3
 
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