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What are you reading?

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
Barns & Noble still exhists?
The chain reinvented themselves here at least. The ones here offer services 3D printing and print-on-demand, plus they have really good speaker events by different authors, though COVID-19 stalled that for awhile. But the branches here have nice cafes as well too, so you can buy a book and just read while you eat.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
I finished reading Our Malady: Lessons in Liberty from a Hospital Diary by Timothy D. Snyder, which was a harrowing personal of Dr. Snyder's time in the hospital, but also comprehensive starting point for a conversation about policy and cultural changes we could make to our healthcare system coming off the pandemic. This was probably one of my more interesting reads this year so far. I'd also recommend reading On Tyranny and Bloodlands by him as well too, particularly since the later has become extremely relevant.

I also finished the Tensorate series by Neon Yang during my time off earlier this month, which included The Red Threads of Fortune, The Descent of Monsters, and The Ascent to Godhood. The novellas can be read individually, though they are better read in sequence and this is the rare series where each installment is better than the last.

I listened to an audiobook my girlfriend had on for a few nights call Bubbles In Space: Tropical Punch S.C. Jensen, which I was initially sold on but I kind of wound up liking due to the 80s and vaporware aesthetic. The book revolves around a cyborg private detective who wins a ticket for a ride on luxury spacecraft and winds up having to solve a murder than seems to keep happening ... of the same person in different places. The story is a mashup of Blade Runner and The Fifth Element basically.

Currently, I'm reading Against Authority by John Twelve Hawks and Gideon The Ninth by Tamsyn Muir.
 
The Martian, by Andy Weir.

I especially enjoy its ability to provide a sense of lighthearted comfort well blended with the fight for survival. It exceptionally feels like a "everything is going to be okay, just don't give up and stay strong".
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
I finished Against Authority by John Twelve Hawks, which I thought was going to be a generic book on privacy and surveillance you see touted all the time in tech news, but actually made me think about modern privacy and the commercial surveillance industry. I don't agree all of Twelve Hawk's premises, but it did make think about some of clients I've worked with and how they do business. If nothing else, it showed me a different perspective.

I'm still reading Gideon The Ninth, but I also bought Kundo Wakes Up by Saad Z Houssain since I liked The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. Kundo Wakes Up follows Kundo, a depressed artist in a futuristic and sinking Chittagong whose wife mysteriously left him. The book follows him as he tries to finds his wife and why she left him.
 
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FlareAeon

Friendly, Gluttonous, definitely not chubby floof.
I'm not really "reading" per se (honestly I'm not sure if it should go hear or in the "What are you listening to" thread) but I did finally pick up a few Game of Thrones audiobooks, no spoilers please lol. So far, I really enjoy it!
 

tentiv

Active Member
I recently finished Giovanni's Room, a gay romance published in 1953. It was sad and beautiful, really got into the struggle against one's natural desires. It was heartbreaking to see the main character deny the possibility of any future in a homosexual relationship, even though he longs for it. It made me grateful that I live in a time where countless people have fought and won the right to be seen as equal, so I'll never have to live in the world described in the book. I never read much LGBT literature when I was growing up, so I thought I should hit the big names in the genre.

I'm not really "reading" per se (honestly I'm not sure if it should go hear or in the "What are you listening to" thread) but I did finally pick up a few Game of Thrones audiobooks, no spoilers please lol. So far, I really enjoy it!
I stumbled over The North Remembers, a fanfic attempt to finish the story after A Dance With Dragons: https://archiveofourown.org/works/336407/chapters/543997
I absolutely recommend it if you finish ADWD and become frustrated that the story still isn't finished. She imitates Martin's style very well, keeps the essence of every character intact, and bashes them together in interesting ways. There is the occasional sour note such as characters sometimes using modern-day terms (the author edited the story to remove the word "vasoconstrictor" because a commenter pointed out that no one in Westeros knows that veins constrict and dilate), and it looks like a few characters were just dropped (edit: Nope, they're just in the second half!). Another commenter said he was in his 70s, and was grateful that he could have an ending to the story before he passed. I consider that a true seal of quality. Even with its minor flaws, it is infinitely better than Martin's The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring, simply because it exists.
 
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Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
Gideon The Ninth by Tamsyn Muir was great; it was probably the best science fiction/fantasy book I've read this so far. The book has it all: humor, prose, compelling characters, brilliant setting, and well-written plot that crosses genres. The plot follows Gideon Nav, a young swordswoman on Pluto who is enlisted by the young necromancer, Harrowhawk Nonagesimus, who rules the world to accompany her to challenge given to her by the emperor on the galactic empire they live under, despite both of them despising each other. The challenge will take on Earth and the champions of the challenge will be granted immortality as the most trusted servants of the emperor. During the challenge, a murder happens and Gideon and Harrowhawk, along with the other challenge participants are forced to solve it and the mysteries surround the challenge they've been tasked to complete.

The story combines science fiction elements (like galactic empires and space travel) and fantasy elements (magic, necromancy, aristocratic houses, swordplay, ghosts), making for a unique setting. There's also strong LGBT representation in the cast, including the protagonist.

The book is an entertaining read and I've already gotten the sequel.

I'm still reading Kundo Wakes Up, but I also downloaded the ebook and audiobook of The Salvage Crew by Yudhanjaya Wijeratne, which was recommended to me.
 

Selene Purr

New Member
Just started up The Horses Know by Lynn Mann. Couldnt really tell you the premise, my attention spans been short lately. A girl who connects with her horse, though.

Stereotypical horse/rider book IMO. Doesn't really fit with the reality of actual horse ownership but! A good and fun read nevertheless, in its own way. I really got to start reading some more, been stuck on so many books at once I never really get around to finishing any one of them.
 

ForestWitchBrews

Moon Worshipper
I'm currently reading The Wolf in the Whale by Jordanna Max Brodsky.
It's a unique book, somewhat of an urban fantasy-esque, but not modern day. It depicts a young, Inuit shaman who is trying to save their family. In their journey, they encounter Vikings and have to essentially work together to end a war between their gods and another god. I'm really enjoying its imagery.
 

QueenSekhmet

A Nightmare Dressed Like A Daydream
i'm currently reading a big ass comic version of the bible (namely the new testament). i feel like not enough people talk about how john the baptist just straight up get's his head cut off for yelling at a king about his life choices.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
I wrapped up Kundo Wakes Up by Saad Z Houssain. The book weaved together cyberpunk and fantasy together in such an original way even better than The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. What I liked most about the book, though, was how it dealt with the themes of gaming, aging, depression, loneliness, life's purpose, the increasing role of algorithms in determining people's lives, climate change, and wealth inequality.

I really want to read more of this author's work when I have time.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
Finished The Salvage Crew by Yudhanjaya Wijeratne, which hit the right notes of humor, ideas, characterization, and plotting for me. The author was unknown to me before, but this book blew away my expectations completely.

The plot follows AMBER ROSE, an artificial intelligence based on an uploaded human consciousness who is overseeing a salvage expedition on the alien world of Urmahon Beta. During the expedition, AMBER ROSE and his human crew encounter unforeseen complications in the form of gigantic alien wildlife, adverse weather, and cyborg mercenaries from a rival power bloc, among other things.

I was a little wary of the generic-sounding plot, but Wijeratne adds new twists to it along with snappy first-person narration, which Nathan Fillion voices brilliantly on the audiobook. I'd recommend getting at least the audiobook; I got both it and the ebook.

Also, the AMBER ROSE is a Nyogi Buddhist who writes some kickass poetry. (Though the author used algorithms to generate most of the poetry in the book, along with some plot elements.)
 
(Recently remembered these forums exist, and this seems like a nice thread to keep up with haha). I've been trying to read more recently in-between work and housekeeping. Currently chipping away at both 'The Book Thief' and 'Lolita', depending on my mood.

I actually didn't know much about 'The Book Thief''s setting and plot focus before I started it (I remembered 'The Jesse Owens Incident' from a few minutes of the movie I caught a glimpse of years ago, but that was it). It's ended up being uncomfortably timely in several parts, given the situation in Ukraine now, and a few different political subjects going on in the USA... I feel like it's probably helped the book sink in more and allowed me to process/ponder a lot of important things, but at the same time, it definitely turns an already emotional book into a bit of suffocating dread if I start to spiral too deeply... I'm... maybe a third of the way through? I'll have to check later. So yeah, very well written, love the unique narration style and timeline jumping/pov shifts. It has a very creative and gripping way of telling its story. Definitely a book that makes you think and has a lot of important things to say. Also, ironically, my copy is 'stolen' (from a family member's shelf when they moved out lol).

'Lolita' is one of those classics that's been on my to-read list for almost a decade. It has exceeded my expectations in every way. I love the prose. I love how utterly hateable, pathetic, and disgusting the main character is, and yet somehow he can sometimes be charismatic or seem nearly logical. The psychology of what makes him tick and how he justifies things is fascinating to read. My one complaint is all the french lines, as the version I'm reading would make it a pain to stop and translate every other page, but that's a me issue. And to be honest, maybe not knowing and having to hope my context clues are enough makes it more immersive. I'm a dumb english-speaking girl and he's far smarter and more worldly, don't you see? I can't remember how far in I am, maybe between a third and halfway.

I'm hoping to finish both books in the next month or so. Maybe find something a little more light-hearted to read after, or some actual furry literature :0c
 

WulfeVanDerKross

Anthro-Fantasy Novelist ("The Saga of Fidonhaal")
Currently doing Season of Storms, the somewhat recent-ish book in the Witcher series that's basically a prequel to the main storyline.
I'm a bit over halfway through, where
Geralt's on the boat that has been heading toward his intended destination, but gets lost in a bog because the people on board are being targeted by an aguara (shape-shifting fox lady/creature)
.

I've really enjoyed Witcher 3 (currently replaying it, in fact), and I have the first game as well and would like to think I'll eventually get around to trying to play through it, and perhaps the second one someday as well, but I haven't really watched the Netflix show. I've otherwise read through all the other books aside from Storms, unless something else has escaped my notice. I enjoy the series alright for what it is. It's not my all-time favorite, but it has it's place.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
(Recently remembered these forums exist, and this seems like a nice thread to keep up with haha). I've been trying to read more recently in-between work and housekeeping. Currently chipping away at both 'The Book Thief' and 'Lolita', depending on my mood.

I actually didn't know much about 'The Book Thief''s setting and plot focus before I started it (I remembered 'The Jesse Owens Incident' from a few minutes of the movie I caught a glimpse of years ago, but that was it). It's ended up being uncomfortably timely in several parts, given the situation in Ukraine now, and a few different political subjects going on in the USA... I feel like it's probably helped the book sink in more and allowed me to process/ponder a lot of important things, but at the same time, it definitely turns an already emotional book into a bit of suffocating dread if I start to spiral too deeply... I'm... maybe a third of the way through? I'll have to check later. So yeah, very well written, love the unique narration style and timeline jumping/pov shifts. It has a very creative and gripping way of telling its story. Definitely a book that makes you think and has a lot of important things to say. Also, ironically, my copy is 'stolen' (from a family member's shelf when they moved out lol).

'Lolita' is one of those classics that's been on my to-read list for almost a decade. It has exceeded my expectations in every way. I love the prose. I love how utterly hateable, pathetic, and disgusting the main character is, and yet somehow he can sometimes be charismatic or seem nearly logical. The psychology of what makes him tick and how he justifies things is fascinating to read. My one complaint is all the french lines, as the version I'm reading would make it a pain to stop and translate every other page, but that's a me issue. And to be honest, maybe not knowing and having to hope my context clues are enough makes it more immersive. I'm a dumb english-speaking girl and he's far smarter and more worldly, don't you see? I can't remember how far in I am, maybe between a third and halfway.

I'm hoping to finish both books in the next month or so. Maybe find something a little more light-hearted to read after, or some actual furry literature :0c
The Book Thief is good book, but it can be dark at times, admittedly.

Hope to see more of you around here.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
Benton's 'Invertebrate Palaeontology and Evolution'
because I thought I should read something that challenges me.

I read it before about 6 years ago and I'm pretty sure I've become significantly dumber since.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
Last night I finished Rosebud by Paul Cornell, which is a first contact story about five digital beings working onboard a corporate exploration spacecraft around Saturn who encounter an alien artifact amidst its rings. The perspective on the alien in this novella was actually original and felt actually alien; the characters do struggle to figure out the alien technology and its implications. The science was iffy, especially regarding the alien technology covered in the story, so I wouldn't call this a hard science novel.

However, what I really liked was the glimpse into the far future society crew is from and was exiled from. It was convincing and nightmarish, more so than the alien object itself. All of the characters are criminals, by their company's standards, who are serving sentences as explorers, prospectors, and miners on board the eponymous Rosebud, where their minds have been forcibly uploaded and regularly conditioned to accept company, even against their will. People looking forward to brain uploading should read book for the downsides. :^)

But the setting is a Solar System dominated by the Company, which has subsumed most governments and corporations in wake of a catastrophic climate change. Global warming is ravaging Mars, where the terraforming has realistically gone wrong, and all extraterrestrial colonies are under restrictive control. Mind uploading is regularly used as punishment for even minor crimes and offenders are used as penal labor.

The crew itself is even more interesting. It consists of an artificial intelligence who started life as a videogame character, an English trans woman who was executed for when transphobic government came to power, an American polyamorous man who was executed by Christian fundamental government left over from series of civil wars, a Russian artificial intelligence that was originally created for social warfare before being discarded, and a collective intelligence formed by uplifted bees created to fill the vacuum left by regular bees going extinct due to colony collapse disorder. Yeah, all the backstories are depressing to varying degrees.

However, despite the despairing nature of the book, I found it enjoyable and would recommend reading to the end. It packs a lot into 108 pages and I definitely thought it was a page turner, particularly towards the end.
 

Attaman

"I say we forget this business and run."
The Age of Wood by Roland Ennos. It's a convoluted at times, and by that I mean it gets distracted, but considering the subject matter that's not too surprising.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.

reptile logic

An imposter among aliens.
(edit: Just read )"Friends in High Places", by Donna Leon. It is one of many detective murder mysteries written by her, a favorite author of a friend of mine. It's a quick and easy read. The setting is in Venice, Italy, and the core protagonist, throughout the series, is a rather jaded detective. Her style is very visual and easy to follow, and the characters are very relatable. Though the read was enjoyable, as a rule I tend to avoid serial novels. I'd read another if given to me, but not likely buy one or check it out from a library.
 
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Xitheon

The cat's mother.
I finished reading Moby Dick last night. I'm trying to work my way through all of the classics. It was a bit dry, but I'm proud of finishing it.

I missed a lot of school because of my mental health problems and I'm trying to catch up.
 

Miles Marsalis

The Last DJ.
I finished reading Moby Dick last night. I'm trying to work my way through all of the classics. It was a bit dry, but I'm proud of finishing it.

I missed a lot of school because of my mental health problems and I'm trying to catch up.
Moby Dick is a decent read, but what other classics are you planning on reading?
 
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