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What's your all time favorite book?

Deathless

ƤƦƠƓ MЄƬƛԼ ЄƝʆƠƳЄƦ
Now, I really hate reading, but the best book I've ever read was a biography of a musical genius, and one of my personal heroes, Neal Morse. His whole life story is in his book, 'Testimony' and he also has autobooks (which are really helpful to me) and it feels comforting to have him read his whole life story to me.

When I saw him live back in February last year, I got my copy signed by him. I'm really not religious, but I still love the fact he even signed it for me, it really means the world to me and it's one of my most prized possessions (blocked out my name for personal reasons lol)!
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MosquitoBeest

Small but Mighty
I think I have to say Timeline by Michael Crichton. I read it at a time when I had been in such a reading slump and as soon as I started that book I was hooked to every page. So good, so good.
 

grrfret

Member
I think I have to say Timeline by Michael Crichton. I read it at a time when I had been in such a reading slump and as soon as I started that book I was hooked to every page. So good, so good.
Ooh, I forgot about Timeline. Excellent book and I also couldn't stop reading once I started. "Quantum Foam makes me roam". Congo and Sphere, also by Michael Crichton, are also really good.
 

MosquitoBeest

Small but Mighty
Ooh, I forgot about Timeline. Excellent book and I also couldn't stop reading once I started. "Quantum Foam makes me roam". Congo and Sphere, also by Michael Crichton, are also really good.
I have read those too! Actually, the only ones I still have left to read are State of Fear, The Great Train Robbery, and Eaters of the Dead.
 
I love japanese literature and specially the Ero Guro Nansensu genre. My favourite author is Tanizaki Junichiro, and I recomend all his works, but my favourite is his essay In Praise of Shadows (only a true genius can speak both about toilets and Kabuki with just a few pages between them without making you go full WTF?).

My favourite book ever is The Grave of the Fireflies by Nosaka Akiyuki. The film is great and all, but if you want to experience some deep sorrow, then read the book. To me, the feeling the movie provides is nowhere closer to what the book can make you feel.

And recently I've read No longer Human by Dazai Osamu. If you like comics, then read Ito Junji's adptation. To me, both should be read together as companion pieces, for the book covers what the manga is lacking and vice versa.
 

JuniperW

Birb Fanatic
Mine is House of Chains by Steven Erikson. It's one of the only books that has ever made me cry, to be honest. There was something so moving about one of the final scenes (that I'm not going to spoil) that instantly landed it as my favourite book.
Jurassic Park is a close second.
 

Skittles

Queen of FaF. Empress of Fløøf.
Mine is House of Chains by Steven Erikson. It's one of the only books that has ever made me cry, to be honest. There was something so moving about one of the final scenes (that I'm not going to spoil) that instantly landed it as my favourite book.
Jurassic Park is a close second.
Omg!! I know the exact scene!!! It was a brutal book! I need to read the rest.
 

Pinkporro

PinkPorroQueen
Oh mhy this is such a hard question i love so manny books !! I think my all time favorite would be the host ^,..,^
 

OberonIV

Member
Despite being in college I think the last time I read a book that wasn't manga start to finish was in highschool. That aside, I really liked A Separate Peace. The gay subtext was through the roof and I was repressed lmao
 

Stray Cat Terry

고먐미
Troisème Humanité series, by Bernard Werber.

It simply explains the humanity so well with some exaggerations and fictional setups. (which I believe some of them are rather undiscovered than fictional)

If more people read this and can review their sins, world could be a better place perhaps. But that's impossible.

Plus, one of the main concept 'Human have been, and will be, although in a whole different shape' fits my moral. I have been using this concept on my fictional universe which initially was planned for a videogame. This fact alone made me get so intrigued in his novel series.

Show yourself this series and make the rest of your life more considerate, I highly recommend. Not that I'm saying you are bad or anything, no offense at all. But I'm sure it will 'upgrade' your brain in a couple of ways.

And what's funny, is that the COVID stuff right now is simply a real life counterpart of disasters from his novels. I love how it's turning, and I believe the present humanity shall experience something big that we'll change. Not that I'm saying I like the tragedies, I mean the change itself. And the flow is starting to fit my fictional universe, which had humanity deprived since 2020. (I made this setup in 2014)
 

WXYZ

No longer using this site
I almost cried reading 1984
That's one of the few books that stuck with me. Read it in elementary school, and it still echoes around my head on occasions.
As for my favorite, I don't have much, even if I was an avid reader for a time. If webcomics can be considered a book, though, I'd say Homestuck.
 

Frank Gulotta

Send us your floppy
Lord of the Barnyard by Tristan Egolf
Also loved Hoffmann's the Devil's elixirs, not too sure which one I prefer
 

Sarachaga

Definitely not a lizard
Mine is Les Misérables by Victor Hugo . I find it really griping as a story. Pretty much an epic rollercoaster ride.
If I had to pick another one, I'd say A scanner darkly by K. Dick.
 

hara-surya

Deviated Prevert
I was thinking about starting a thread about books you reread often, but this will do.

I've found I reread William Gibson's Sprawl and Bridge Trilogies every election year. If you know the subject matter of those books, you'll understand why, but we're practically living in the back-story to a 1980s or -90s cyberpunk novel. (Ignoring how many are set in the past or present these days.)

Also, I've read "The Hunt For Red October" more times than any other novel and it's been a totally different book every time. When I was 10yo (in 1989, right as the movie came out) it was a neat adult-level book my parents let me read, at 16yo it was a cool book about submarines, at 35 it was a compelling, if dated, spy novel.

Ditto, the "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" which is funny when you're 10yo, deep when you're 16yo and the freaking truth when you're 37yo.
 
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zvander

coygirl
The Velveteen Rabbit.
It's no marvel of modern fiction, but I'd listen to that damn thing on tape constantly growing up. Had my own velvet bunny stuffed animal for a long time because of it.
 

hara-surya

Deviated Prevert
I almost cried reading 1984

Read Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. If Nineteen Eighty-Four got you thinking about how messed up modern politics are, Brave New World will horrify you with how things really are. (People happily live in a repressive totalitarianism where the State controls even your biology from birth, because of gross consumerism and psychoactive drugs.)
 

hardman13

Bouncy faithful powerful fox.
I think on of my favourites ever is Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman (Golden Compass in America). It's so interesting, and the story is bloody fantastic.
 

milimigu

Member
I have no absolute favorite BOOK, but my favorite author is definitely Tamora Pierce! I love all the books she's written, pretty much. They're all medieval fantasy books, some about lady knights, and some about more domestic magic. they're super well written and the found family trope abounds, and I LOVE that trope SO MUCHHH :00

I think on of my favourites ever is Northern Lights by Phillip Pullman (Golden Compass in America). It's so interesting, and the story is bloody fantastic.
That is a great book!! I really like his idea for daemons, too, I think it's super creative and I honestly wish he'd explored the concept more. Plus, bears. With armor.
 

aomagrat

Well-Known Member
It is hard to say what my favorite book is. I am an avid reader, and if I like a book I will keep it. I have hundreds of books lining the walls of my home. And I have read most of them more than once. Here are a few that I have read multiple times.

"The Dixie Association" by Donald Hayes
A story about a misfit minor league baseball team in the deep south. The book examines racism, sexism, and religious intolerance as the team plays out the season. It is hilarious at times, sad at times, and always entertaining.

"Shoot an Arrow to Stop the Wind" by Colin Stuart
Set in the 1920's in Montana, a teenage mixed race boy goes to the reservation to meet his Blackfoot grandmother (who still lives in a teepee) and connects with his Blackfoot heritage. A coming of age story set in the not quite civilized frontier.

"Walks Far Woman" by Colin Stuart
A young Blackfoot man returning home from WWII asks for his Great Grandmother's blessing to marry a white woman. In a story told in flashbacks, the old woman tells her story to the young white woman, starting from when she was 18, widowed, and saved by a white trapper, adopted by a Sioux family, fought through the Indian Wars, including Little Bighorn, and much more, eventually welcoming the young woman into her family and revealing a family secret that ties both families together. If this book doesn't touch your heart, you don't have one.

"Wild Pony Island" by Stephen Meader
This is a children's book that I read in the 1960's.
The protagonist's life so paralleled my own that it remains one of my favorites.
 
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