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What's Your Personality Type?

Personality Type (Had to exclude the first letter - E or I)

  • *NTP

    Votes: 9 15.0%
  • *NTJ

    Votes: 8 13.3%
  • *NFP

    Votes: 20 33.3%
  • *NFJ

    Votes: 14 23.3%
  • *STP

    Votes: 2 3.3%
  • *STJ

    Votes: 2 3.3%
  • *SFP

    Votes: 2 3.3%
  • *SFJ

    Votes: 3 5.0%

  • Total voters
    60
O

Okami_No_Heishi

Guest
Screenshot_2016-12-02-07-45-49.png
me all day!!
 

AsheSkyler

Feathered Jester
Personality types fluctuate throughout life, sometimes changing almost completely just within a couple months. It's a little unusual to have the same type for so long, but that change back then is expected.
You're the first I've seen to say that. Whenever a mention of type changing comes up, it's usually a rant about how your type is completely based on how your brain is wired and thus can't change. At all. Ever. But I disagree. My dabblings in neurology and psychology suggest the brain can change pathways and whatnot, and not always due to physical trauma, ergo, types can change!

Keirsey pegged me as an INFJ when I was 16. From 20+, I've mostly scored INTJ across the board. Some odd sites like Keys2Cognition or those tests that go from a function perspective will peg me as an ISTJ or INTP instead. PersonalityPage has a kiddie version, and supposedly I was an ExTJ in my younger days.
 

Tetrachroma

"nEw UsEr"
You're the first I've seen to say that. Whenever a mention of type changing comes up, it's usually a rant about how your type is completely based on how your brain is wired and thus can't change. At all. Ever. But I disagree. My dabblings in neurology and psychology suggest the brain can change pathways and whatnot, and not always due to physical trauma, ergo, types can change!

Keirsey pegged me as an INFJ when I was 16. From 20+, I've mostly scored INTJ across the board. Some odd sites like Keys2Cognition or those tests that go from a function perspective will peg me as an ISTJ or INTP instead. PersonalityPage has a kiddie version, and supposedly I was an ExTJ in my younger days.
Wow, people actually think that? Just a couple years ago I got ESFP. It matched me perfectly at the time, as ISFJ does today. It would make sense that your personality type is tied to personal growth and development in life.
 

AsheSkyler

Feathered Jester
Wow, people actually think that? Just a couple years ago I got ESFP. It matched me perfectly at the time, as ISFJ does today. It would make sense that your personality type is tied to personal growth and development in life.
Aye, and some can get pretty nasty about it. Although I guess that's expected. Under the assumption some parts of the pathway thing are correct, this chart was pretty doggone cool: Introversion and Extroversion: A Matter of the Brain. - Dave Enjoys
 

Felidire

Member
Whenever a mention of type changing comes up, it's usually a rant about how your type is completely based on how your brain is wired and thus can't change. At all. Ever. But I disagree. My dabblings in neurology and psychology suggest the brain can change pathways and whatnot, and not always due to physical trauma, ergo, types can change!

If personalities did change, then typological systems like this would be completely worthless (I guess it's kind of like saying "Jesus isn't real", or "satan/god are the same entity, it's a conspiracy!" to a religious fanatic). XD

The body is incredibly efficient, it doesn't waste space. Rerouting is necessary with brain trauma, and would definitely have the potential to change one's personality, but it's difficult to imagine the brain creating workarounds for uncompromised processing regions, resulting in drastic personality shifts, or something?

MBTI types are just an arrangement of Jungian cognitive functions. The purpose that each function serves varies depending on the position they're placed within the stack. Each personality type has a (highly generalized) inclination to favour - and thus develop - certain functions before/over others; some are more rewarding and others stressful depending on the individual.

Behaviours are largely influenced by subjective experiences, which are ever expanding (not dissimilar to the universe, I guess?). Cognitive functions are just an oversimplified reference to certain portions of the brain, and I'd surmise that the 'strength/development' of each function reflects the idiosyncratic, habitual tendencies one develops from their subjective experiences.

The way I look at it, we experience things, which in turn influences our behaviour, leading to a new set of experiences relevant to our behaviour, and so on. While I can't really convey how I look at it, say our ego is created at point zero shortly after birth, and we start walking in one direction. There's 16 types and 360º, so lets assume generalized categories for personality are separated into 22.5º fields, which fan out; sure, we can sidestep or gradually turn, but the further we travel from point zero, the more difficult it becomes to 'change' personality type. Of course that's a very one-dimensional example for a multidimensional model, but my point is that everything becomes very ingrained. it makes me think about how one's DNA changes permanently during their lifetime.
 

Royn

Otterest Sergal evah!
Mediator. INFP-A. Generally yes, test accurate here.
 

bhutrflai

Okami The Wolf is my crazy half!
Don't remember the actual letters. But I was given mediator. And from the description, it had me about 95% correct. And that's my current personality. 15yr ago, I was a totally different person, and not on a good way. I'm not sure I'd want to see those results.
 

AsheSkyler

Feathered Jester
If personalities did change, then typological systems like this would be completely worthless (I guess it's kind of like saying "Jesus isn't real", or "satan/god are the same entity, it's a conspiracy!" to a religious fanatic). XD
Naw, not completely worthless! But I love to flirt with the middle and think about weird stuff, so I reckon there's my disclaimer for the following. :p

The body is incredibly efficient, it doesn't waste space. Rerouting is necessary with brain trauma, and would definitely have the potential to change one's personality, but it's difficult to imagine the brain creating workarounds for uncompromised processing regions, resulting in drastic personality shifts, or something?
I think that's where the psychology and accompanying neurology usually leads to some really heated debates when physical (or even emotional) trauma isn't involved. There have been documented cases where terminal patients were so stubborn about living, they overcame what should have been impossible and healed. And those of perfect physical health so convinced they were going to die, they died without any medical explanation whatsoever. I'm not a doctor in any field and I haven't met any of the rather uncommon cases in those examples, so I can't say even I believe them 100%. But it certainly makes for an interesting think toy! Under the assumption that those weren't some kind of sci-fi stories and some people do possess will power to that degree, wouldn't it be possible for a person to willingly change their type, even though it'd be a bit rare?

MBTI types are just an arrangement of Jungian cognitive functions. The purpose that each function serves varies depending on the position they're placed within the stack. Each personality type has a (highly generalized) inclination to favour - and thus develop - certain functions before/over others; some are more rewarding and others stressful depending on the individual.
The vast, vast majority, yes, I'd say what ye be is what ye be since the typology system is meant to describe how your brain works rather than dictate a personal preference, like the museums vs. movie theatres thing commonly used to separate introverts and extraverts. A thinker may be directed largely by logic, but if they have strong enough feelings about something, no amount of logic will dissuade them from following their emotions. Even though it is quite hotly disputed whether or not a person can access their inferior/shadow functions, if you are such an individual who can use the positive side of them (or so unstable your secondaries show up more than your primaries), I'd say it's possible you would present as another type that you were not, and that could likely lead to some of the questioning of whether types can switch. In the Enneagram system, in example, a low-functioning/unhealthy 1 can easily be mistaken for a 6.

Behaviours are largely influenced by subjective experiences, which are ever expanding (not dissimilar to the universe, I guess?). Cognitive functions are just an oversimplified reference to certain portions of the brain, and I'd surmise that the 'strength/development' of each function reflects the idiosyncratic, habitual tendencies one develops from their subjective experiences.
I find that to be the great tease and the most fun to think about. Are your functions set in stone, like how your left hand will always be a left hand and will never have the physical characteristics that would make it a right hand, or is it possible to develop those other areas enough to actually switch, like how some people become so ambidextrous that they end up using one hand more than the other for some stuff? That be the root of the matter, methinks.

The way I look at it, we experience things, which in turn influences our behaviour, leading to a new set of experiences relevant to our behaviour, and so on. While I can't really convey how I look at it, say our ego is created at point zero shortly after birth, and we start walking in one direction. There's 16 types and 360º, so lets assume generalized categories for personality are separated into 22.5º fields, which fan out; sure, we can sidestep or gradually turn, but the further we travel from point zero, the more difficult it becomes to 'change' personality type. Of course that's a very one-dimensional example for a multidimensional model, but my point is that everything becomes very ingrained. it makes me think about how one's DNA changes permanently during their lifetime.
Oo, neat! I hadn't heard before a person's DNA can change. Or maybe I had and forgotten... I'm making a note of that for a future research binge. :D

Ahem, er, yes. I'd say that analogy works out rather well.
 

rhansen23

Sailorhusky
ENFJ here, I love this test. On the ship, I'd get all my co-workers to take it when we were underway.
 
ESTJ, like I thought I'd be.

MIND
This trait determines how we interact with our environment.
Extraverted: 78%
Introverted: 22%

ENERGY
This trait shows where we direct our mental energy.
Intuitive: 41%
Observant: 59%

NATURE
This trait determines how we make decisions and cope with emotions.
Thinking: 57%
Feeling: 43%

TACTICS
This trait reflects our approach to work, planning and decision-making.
Judging: 72%
Prospecting: 28%

IDENTITY
This trait underpins all others, showing how confident we are in our abilities and decisions.
Assertive: 44%
Turbulent: 56%

estj-personality-type-header.png

EXECUTIVE PERSONALITY (ESTJ, -A/-T)
Good order is the foundation of all things.
-Edmund Burke

Executives are representatives of tradition and order, utilizing their understanding of what is right, wrong and socially acceptable to bring families and communities together. Embracing the values of honesty, dedication and dignity, people with the Executive personality type are valued for their clear advice and guidance, and they happily lead the way on difficult paths. Taking pride in bringing people together, Executives often take on roles as community organizers, working hard to bring everyone together in celebration of cherished local events, or in defense of the traditional values that hold families and communities together.

sentinels_Executive_ESTJ_introduction.png

Anyone Worth Their Salt Sticks Up for What They Believe Is Right...
Demand for such leadership is high in democratic societies, and forming no less than 11% of the population, it’s no wonder that many of America’s presidents have been Executives. Strong believers in the rule of law and
authority that must be earned, Executive personalities lead by example, demonstrating dedication and purposeful honesty, and an utter rejection of laziness and cheating, especially in work. If anyone declares hard, manual work to be an excellent way to build character, it is Executives.

Executives are aware of their surroundings and live in a world of clear, verifiable facts – the surety of their knowledge means that even against heavy resistance, they stick to their principles and push an unclouded vision of what is and is not acceptable. Their opinions aren’t just empty talk either, as Executives are more than willing to dive into the most challenging projects, improving action plans and sorting details along the way, making even the most complicated tasks seem easy and approachable.

However, Executives don’t work alone, and they expect their reliability and work ethic to be reciprocated – people with this personality type meet their promises, and if partners or subordinates jeopardize them through incompetence or laziness, or worse still, dishonesty, they do not hesitate to show their wrath. This can earn them a reputation for inflexibility, a trait shared by all Sentinel personalities, but it’s not because Executives are arbitrarily stubborn, but because they truly believe that these values are what make society work.
 

Caraid

Classy cat
Last time I tested I was the ENTP ("The Debater") personality.

More of an ambivert than an extrovert though - I thrive on social interaction and feel like shit if I don't get to be around people for too long, but I do grow very tired of it after a while and need my alone-recharge-time.
 

Sarachaga

Definitely not a lizard
I'm an ENFJ("The Protagonist"). That's interesting. It's the first time I take such a test even though I read a bit about the MBTI a while ago. I see that there are lots of NFJs around. High five guys!
 

Vince_Werewolf

Herbivoraceous Musician
INFP-T
 
M

MaikeruNezumi

Guest
INTP-T
I've taken personality tests like this beforehand, so I knew what I was already.
But seeing the A/T at the end threw me for a loop though, so I had to look that up.
 
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