• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Why can I draw as good digitally as I do traditional drawings?

Kope

Artist?
Banned
You need pen-rotation to emulate calligraphy properly, irl calligraphy brushes are elongated ink pens that look different as you rotate the pen. Keeping a fixed angle is ok for certain calligraphic writing styles but the angle is too forced for most art styles. If I recall only the Wacom Art Pen supporting tablets can handle true pen rotation.
You may get on better with a regular tablet, you may get on better with a screen tablet, even for longstanding pros it varies a lot and there's an expense to it. Most tablets are good/bad based on their technological accuracy rather than whether they have a screen or not, and surface texture is usually much better for non-screen tablets.
Unfortunately, iPad I don't think supports pen-rotation but you can probably emulate ink-brushes with the pen-tilt but in general I'd avoid calligraphy in artwork unless it's something you specifically are going for stylistically as it tends to make your lines look more fun than they are accurate which is bad visual feedback for a beginner.


Am not sure what you mean here. What do you mean by physical or harder here?
Like it's more messy and involved due to erasing and the like so I feel more pressure to get it right
 

Fluxbender

Active Member
I feel like I’m only good at physical stuff now idk, maybe it’s because I have to try harder or something to create.
Are you saying that you think you have artist's block with digital art?

You need pen-rotation to emulate calligraphy properly, irl calligraphy brushes are elongated ink pens that look different as you rotate the pen. Keeping a fixed angle is ok for certain calligraphic writing styles but the angle is too forced for most art styles. If I recall only the Wacom Art Pen supporting tablets can handle true pen rotation.
You may get on better with a regular tablet, you may get on better with a screen tablet, even for longstanding pros it varies a lot and there's an expense to it. Most tablets are good/bad based on their technological accuracy rather than whether they have a screen or not, and surface texture is usually much better for non-screen tablets.
Unfortunately, iPad I don't think supports pen-rotation but you can probably emulate ink-brushes with the pen-tilt but in general I'd avoid calligraphy in artwork unless it's something you specifically are going for stylistically as it tends to make your lines look more fun than they are accurate which is bad visual feedback for a beginner.
Using a Wacom Cintq here so yes I'm used to brush weight and rotation being a thing. I turn the brush rotation off and on depending. For things like map lines I leave the rotation off; the 'fixed angle' of the brush gives an interesting effect when you're doing area borders. But you probably have a point that for general cases it is best to use one of the 'generic round' brushes (especially one with a slight taper /w weight/rotation).
 
Last edited:

Kope

Artist?
Banned
Are you saying that you think you have artist's block with digital art?


Using a Wacom Cintq here so yes I'm used to brush weight and rotation being a thing. I turn the brush rotation off and on depending. For things like map lines I leave the rotation off; the 'fixed angle' of the brush gives an interesting effect when you're doing area borders. But you probably have a point that for general cases it may be best to use one of the 'generic round' brushes (especially one with a slight taper /w weight/rotation).
Yeah sometimes I draw stuff but then get to a point of how do I make this look better or more realistic and fail to come up with anything…
 

Fluxbender

Active Member
Yeah sometimes I draw stuff but then get to a point of how do I make this look better or more realistic and fail to come up with anything…
That's when I would just call the piece done and, if you ever get any ideas, come back to it later. Doing the minimum is better than doing nothing.
 

Kope

Artist?
Banned
That's when I would just call the piece done and, if you ever get any ideas, come back to it later. Doing the minimum is better than doing nothing.
Yeah but I almost never come back to it lol
 

Inafox

Member
Like it's more messy and involved due to erasing and the like so I feel more pressure to get it right
Do you mean you enjoy erasing and then correcting as opposed to a finer construction? People vary a lot on this. I know some people can fashion scribbles into cleaner art but my OCD and attention issues make it difficult for me to see past the noise, I'm better at going over cleaner or less noisy lines. Whatever works for you.

Using a Wacom Cintq here so yes I'm used to brush weight and rotation being a thing. I turn the brush rotation off and on depending. For things like map lines I leave the rotation off; the 'fixed angle' of the brush gives an interesting effect when you're doing area borders. But you probably have a point that for general cases it is best to use one of the 'generic round' brushes (especially one with a slight taper /w weight/rotation).
Yeah, though Cintiq's can be much more expensive, for comparison to the Huion or XP-Pen for example. A beginner who wants a screen-tablet can do just fine without rotation, but Intuous is a cheaper option for rotation without the screen. With sketching and painting, pen tilt is better than rotation since most painting brushes are round, so the rotation only truly emulates calligraphy and flat brushes. I think as a beginner it's something that just adds unnecessary technicalities but certainly it's a nice feature to have for that specific style.

Yeah sometimes I draw stuff but then get to a point of how do I make this look better or more realistic and fail to come up with anything…
In general realism seems easier to me, as realism can be referenced, whereas design relies on your own intuition. Is it possible you're confusing the two?
With realism you can get better by observing real life things. Making something that is designed and in your head to look real relies on the design's accuracy, but if it's just your ability to observe realism that's the issue you can practice that in isolation by studying real objects. As for design, it's not possible to teach design itself but it's possible to learn fundamentals that make a design work/look better in general, invention comes from the combination of knowledge and emergent imagination. A lot of design work is fine-tuning subtleties and the composition, so knowing your fundamentals creates the necessary framework to which you have the free room for artistic license. May be look into character design tutorials?
 

Goldwry

Member
Procreate does have a stabilise feature just Swipe on a brush - edit brush - then crank up the stabilisation in the settings... it’s very helpful
 

Kope

Artist?
Banned
Do you mean you enjoy erasing and then correcting as opposed to a finer construction? People vary a lot on this. I know some people can fashion scribbles into cleaner art but my OCD and attention issues make it difficult for me to see past the noise, I'm better at going over cleaner or less noisy lines. Whatever works for you.


Yeah, though Cintiq's can be much more expensive, for comparison to the Huion or XP-Pen for example. A beginner who wants a screen-tablet can do just fine without rotation, but Intuous is a cheaper option for rotation without the screen. With sketching and painting, pen tilt is better than rotation since most painting brushes are round, so the rotation only truly emulates calligraphy and flat brushes. I think as a beginner it's something that just adds unnecessary technicalities but certainly it's a nice feature to have for that specific style.


In general realism seems easier to me, as realism can be referenced, whereas design relies on your own intuition. Is it possible you're confusing the two?
With realism you can get better by observing real life things. Making something that is designed and in your head to look real relies on the design's accuracy, but if it's just your ability to observe realism that's the issue you can practice that in isolation by studying real objects. As for design, it's not possible to teach design itself but it's possible to learn fundamentals that make a design work/look better in general, invention comes from the combination of knowledge and emergent imagination. A lot of design work is fine-tuning subtleties and the composition, so knowing your fundamentals creates the necessary framework to which you have the free room for artistic license. May be look into character design tutorials?
I’ll try but with no teacher I’ll probably mess it up
 

Kope

Artist?
Banned
Procreate does have a stabilise feature just Swipe on a brush - edit brush - then crank up the stabilisation in the settings... it’s very helpful
Hmm I’ve never noticed it before thanks
 
Top