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Why do Americans use English so poorly?

JArt.

Member
When you learn a new language, you're not even sure what you're really saying and how it should be, so you follow all the rules hoping you don't mess it up.
If it's you first language you know exactly what you're doing, so you don't care as much.
 

Fenrari

Prince of Wolves
When you learn a new language, you're not even sure what you're really saying and how it should be, so you follow all the rules hoping you don't mess it up.
If it's you first language you know exactly what you're doing, so you don't care as much.

I know this applies to some people; but it often doesn't apply to everyone. While taking classes for the 4 different languages that I worked with; I often noted individuals who seemingly purposefully fucked up the foreign langauge for their own benefit :/
 

Digitalpotato

Rants like a Gryphon
bcuz we made twitterese & spk that. kthx.


Nah nah nah. Honestly there's no reason to be language purists here.
 

Grimfang

Well-Known Member
The way I've learned to use English -- very casually. When it comes to school or work, be proper. Otherwise, stupid words start polluting my sentences. Like.. man.. dude.. all the bad language..
Grew up on the edge of the south, and I used to hate the bad language and accent. I honestly miss the casual and friendly exchanges with people I don't even know.

wasnt it one time pointed out we do it on purpose to piss off the english, and also we adapt words from other languages to our owned. I mean thats why theres english and american

I've read that the English accent was a newer development, and that Americans (or some) actually speak closer to what the language was long ago. I just don't know how the hell that could be verified.
Now I want to look that up again, and find out exactly how that claim can be supported.


And man, just returning to FAF after so long, it's somehow heart-warming to see Thatch and Roose like this. I'm glad we're all okay (except for the dead that I've already forgotten).
 

Lunar

Son of a WHORE!
Because this is 'MERRICA, and in 'MERRICA, we speak 'MERRICAN.

'MERRICA.
 

Kitutal

cute newbie kitten
Having used english for the last 21 years, I've gotten very comfortable with it and often twist or manipulate it any way I want, but that's nothing like the same as the sort of bad grammar and spelling and mispronouncing and everything that you get from some people, seems like they just can't care.
 

Ariosto

New Member
Nah nah nah. Honestly there's no reason to be language purists here.

Pretty much, only in contexts where it's preferable by social convention should it become mandatory. I speak spanish "correctly" in comparison to many of my peers, but that just means my use is closer to the standarized forms, and even then I insert my own variations and patterns because I'm aware of a certain set of rules that govern my language and twist or employ them to my convinience and liking. This means that, essentially, a variant is a variant, the way the speakers adopt those rules in their context, and, in practice, none is more valid than the other. That there are Academies and Dictionaries is a different matter, though they're necessary for establishing a common ground of communication in certain contexts. I'm refering, of course, to native speakers.
 
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Digitalpotato

Rants like a Gryphon
I've read that the English accent was a newer development, and that Americans (or some) actually speak closer to what the language was long ago. I just don't know how the hell that could be verified.

I've heard the same thing about Quebec french too.

Not so much latin spanish, that's more Spanglish and Nahuatl.
 

Ariosto

New Member
Not so much latin spanish, that's more Spanglish and Nahuatl.

What do you mean?
The pronunciation that characterizes the so called "latin spanish" actually comes from Andalucía, also from where most Spaniards migrated to America during the Colonization, and it was generally viewed as "inferior" to the spanish from Toledo, which closer to modern pronunciation in Spain. That is, if memory doesn't fail me. As for the lexic, it comes from latin, greek, french, english (in modern times particularly), arabic, hebrew, african languages and, of course, indigenous languages.
 

Sarcastic Coffeecup

Hand. Cannot. Erase.
Fenrari: You'll find that any native speaker, when given the opportunity, can and will butcher their mother tongue.
It's a shame, really.
Idk if it's a shame. Most people don't butcher the mother tongue, but pick a dialect. I did so. Language by-the-books is boring. People just wanna be more personal :)
 

Ad Hoc

THIS MACHINE KILLS FASCISTS
Native speakers can break the rules of their language and still be confident that they'll be understood. They also learn it by growing up in it instead of learning the specific rules, etc., stuff that's already been said.

In the end, as long they are able to communicate effectively, the necessary result has been achieved. It's all good.


Even the "best" English speakers tend to have wonked-up grammar if you actually take the time to write it down and try to punctuate it, though. You learn that pretty quick in court reporting--we actually have a modified set of punctuation rules because so much of the spoken word is just about impossible to punctuate traditionally. Folks don't notice it when they're talking or listening because strict grammar rules are a lot less important than one might imagine. I dropped all pretenses of being a grammar "Nazi" (outside of transcript work) after learning this. As long as it's understandable, it's all good.
 

Roose Hurro

Lovable Curmudgeon
Banned
I happen to know that, exactly the reason for why you pointing it out showed that you didn't get what was said.

Oh, you do, do you? :V


Yes, a typo from a person who doesn't show signs of having problems with grammar is very relevant to the topic of people who suck at english.
And mocking is a type of joke, just a malicious one. It SHOULD have been quite obvious, not requireing any further input neither from you nor me. And no, you never asked for an explanation - you just plunged right into a battle about gun rights, because you took it 100% at face value. So no, obviously you don't have a problem. Or a history of this kind of thing. :V

I disagree:

mock (mk)
v. mocked, mock·ing, mocks
v.tr.
1. To treat with ridicule or contempt; deride.
2.
a. To mimic, as in sport or derision. See Synonyms at ridicule.
b. To imitate; counterfeit.
3. To frustrate the hopes of; disappoint.
v.intr.
To express scorn or ridicule; jeer: They mocked at the idea.
n.
1.
a. The act of mocking.
b. Mockery; derision: said it merely in mock.
2. An object of scorn or derision.
3. An imitation or a counterfeit.
adj.
Simulated; false; sham: a mock battle.
adv.
In an insincere or pretending manner: mock sorrowful.

Funny how you're the only one making an issue out of my comment.


And man, just returning to FAF after so long, it's somehow heart-warming to see Thatch and Roose like this. I'm glad we're all okay (except for the dead that I've already forgotten).

Hey, wouldn't be fun for me if I didn't have a challenge or two... glad to see you back, Grim.


Because this is 'MERRICA, and in 'MERRICA, we speak 'MERRICAN.

'MERRICA
.

Heh:

•"Listening to a well-known Hollywood radio commentator some time back, I heard her say that she had just returned from a Yerpeen trip, and had had a lovely time nittly. I at once recognized her as an accomplished Slurvian linguist and, being a student of Slurvian, readily understood that she had just returned from a European trip, and while there (in Yerp) had had a lovely time in Italy."
(John Davenport, "Slurvian Self-Taught." The New Yorker, June 18, 1949)

And this should be entertaining: http://partners.nytimes.com/library/magazine/home/20000917mag-onlanguage.html
 

Randy-Darkshade

Bike riding squirrel thing.
I agree. Though a lot of the time it is down to accents. I'm British so I expect people would think I'd speak perfect english right? Wrong, my accent makes me sound weird, I don;t pronounce words properly due to my accent. Accents play a big part in how people speak. Personally I type out far better English than I do when I am speaking verbally to someone. When my french friend visits I have to speak clearly otherwise she doesn't know what I am saying.

But yeah in short, I think it just boils down to ones accent.
 

Elric

Active Member
People don't use correct english mainly because they are lazy. Just like abbreviations in texts.
 

Randy-Darkshade

Bike riding squirrel thing.
People don't use correct english mainly because they are lazy. Just like abbreviations in texts.

Maybe when typing they do. But do remember on a cell phone you have a character limit, hence text speak. Text speak also makes writing texts faster. However if you are using a laptop or PC there is no excuse really to use text speak. also don't forget some people are dyslexic, which isn't just a black and white case of someone who can't read or write because the level of Dyslexia in people varies greatly. I have a friend who can read smaller, easier words but really struggle to read big long words.
 

Leadbelly

Close Enough
...And yet that didn't stop an English person from actually yelling something like that at a bewildered friend of mine once. Which I why I used it as an example.

Eventually he deciphered that the guy was asking him to grab a flashlight out of the trunk.

I suppose if he was from Essex it would explain it. People there have a slight problem when it comes to talking like a normal human being.
 

Catilda Lily

May all your bacon burn.
Americans Y U NO USE CORRECT ENGLISH?
 

Grimfang

Well-Known Member
Today, I heard myself say "That's about as nough as I can-- ..."
I had to stop right there, since it was a bit of a shock to hear myself say something like that. Then I thought about this thread, and realized that I'm one of them, the ones being discussed in this thread.
:[

Hey, wouldn't be fun for me if I didn't have a challenge or two... glad to see you back, Grim.

:D
 

Kitutal

cute newbie kitten
I got into the habit recently of saying things like 'a whole nother problem'
Actually I want to learn to be fluent in this internet speech thing so I fit in with all my friends, not going too far but a few abbreviations and emoticons and so on perhaps. I'm just not used to it, I always type things out fully and clearly, years of trying to write books rather than text messages done that to me.
 

LouyieBlu

Contemplative Nitwit
You're in the deep south, Fen. Of course nobody's going to speak English there. :V

Proper English is definitely more slurred or spoken differently in the south than in other places. English is my first language, yet I am already fluent in another, and starting on my third, my point is that not all Americans slurr, mess up their words, some actual arent racist, but there are those people who do those things and sometimes it can be offense, sometimes it was just the way they were taught to speak an they dont actual mean offense.

As for shortening of words like..well FAF Fur Affinity Forums or FWA; Furry Weekend Atlanta, I think that people shorten words because it is easy to communicate in a conversation, its much easier to type or say FAF than Fur Affinity Forums, yet they mean the same thing.
Sadly humans will always go for the easier way out, probably related to survival instincts and such.
Americans may do it a bit more than others, but I have seen slurring or shortening in other cultures too.
 
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