• Fur Affinity Forums are governed by Fur Affinity's Rules and Policies. Links and additional information can be accessed in the Site Information Forum.

Would a mandatory “Internettiquette” class do anything?

Just a question that popped into mind recently. It can be agreed upon that there are some pretty unseeable and frightening things in our digital world, but what would happen if a mandatory etiquette class was introduced? (Sounds dystopian, I know :p)

What if users could only access the internet after their 16th birthday? (Perhaps an id or drivers license as proof of age.) And would they have to pass the class?

Would this decrease the amount of predatory, hateful, and strange posts we see on the internet?

I’d personally think it may work for a couple of months, but then sink back into the firestorm that it is today. What do you guys think?

Please keep this civil! This is a hypothetical/philosophic? scenario, not an ethics warground.
 

KD142000

Leather-clad Lobo
I mean, the UK recently thought about doing that with 18+ sites, shall we say (in regards to the proof of age stuff). I didn't think something like that would work.

Predators and hateful people can still get on if they lie, so there's that. Banning people who already have a criminal record for that stuff might be a better option, but then, that could be taken too far.

People are people and thus have their issues and behaviours.
Would I like it if the internet was a safe place for everyone? Of course! Just how I want the world to be a safe and accepting place for everyone.

But honestly, I think we're a long way off that.
 
I mean, the UK recently thought about doing that with 18+ sites, shall we say (in regards to the proof of age stuff). I didn't think something like that would work.

Predators and hateful people can still get on if they lie, so there's that. Banning people who already have a criminal record for that stuff might be a better option, but then, that could be taken too far.

People are people and thus have their issues and behaviours.
Would I like it if the internet was a safe place for everyone? Of course! Just how I want the world to be a safe and accepting place for everyone.

But honestly, I think we're a long way off that.
Yeah, I agree. It would be kinda cool if an etiquette class could decrease the amount of hateful and creepy comments though. It would also be interesting to see how fast the internet would try and work around that. I’d guess about 2-4 months, but perhaps even faster than that?
 

KD142000

Leather-clad Lobo
Yeah, I agree. It would be kinda cool if an etiquette class could decrease the amount of hateful and creepy comments though. It would also be interesting to see how fast the internet would try and work around that. I’d guess about 2-4 months, but perhaps even faster than that?
If I know anything from personal experience, there's a lot of people who take classes in school and they don't listen to a word being said.
It's easy to say 'I'm gonna behave myself' and then go off and not behave yourself online.
The internet responds almost immediately. There's people out there just waiting to be stopped and then work a way around it
 

KD142000

Leather-clad Lobo
On the topic of the UK banning access to 18+ sites unless proof of age is given...
Can I just say that the reasoning 'if kids look at porn, they'll think that's what sex is' is incredibly stupid?

Teach kids about sex, then? Cos if no one bothers, they're gonna think porn is the answer?

Also, adult entertainment has it's place. Adults should be able to access it whenever they like without having to jump through hoops.

That just shows the need for proper sex education, imo. Parents that oppose sex ed genuinely make me angry.

A bit off-topic, but thought I'd say my piece about that.
 

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I think that encouraging teenagers to be considerate, and to think about the real consequences that online harassment can have on people, would be a good thing.

I am not sure it would prevent the behaviour from happening. I feel astute moderation is the answer there.
 

Faexie

Rara for short :)
One of the greatest thing about the internet is how free you are in it (even in countries where it's heavily censored, people find a way around it)

It also brings bad stuff, as you mentioned before, but the internet wouldn't be the same without freedom.
 

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
I think mandatory parenting classes, and offering classes for parents of teenagers about the Internet and how to discuss it with their kids, might have a better effect. At the risk of sounding like a cranky old lady shaking my cane, it seems to me like parents have gotten more complacent with teaching their kids good values, compassion, and general don't-be-a-dick-ness. I've overheard teens talking in ways I would never have dreamed of when I was their age, up to and including describing sexual encounters to their friends for the purpose of ridiculing their partner.

(Not that mandatory classes are any kind of guarantee that people will learn, but I do feel like etiquette/manners is something that parents should be doing a better job of teaching their kids.)

But then, I have yet to see a country that can effectively deal with bullying, so expecting trolling, cyberbullying, doxxing, etc to be very controllable is probably asking for too much.

Banning people who already have a criminal record for that stuff might be a better option, but then, that could be taken too far.
Preventing anyone of working age from using the Internet, for any reason, is honestly getting into willful disenfranchisement in most if not all of the western world. So many businesses only take online applications, most job postings will be online, unemployment or social security may need to be filed online depending on locale, and so on.
 

Doulyboy

I turned myself into a raccoon Morty!!!!
Banned
Can we not use "autism" in that sense please, and can we call 4chan by its name? I don't think the internet should need a license, but clearly people still need an etiquette class...

Exactly this^

Not only is it offensive, but it undermines the dangers of that site and it's harbor for racism and hate.

To answer the OP, I think the government at this point needs to step in and regulate, by means of moderation so to speak.
The internet is further encroaching our everyday lives, it's about time to have some regulation to keep up with the technology.
 
Last edited:

Filter

ɹǝʇlᴉℲ
Netiquette classes sound like a good idea to me, but I'm not sure how you'd adequately enforce keeping minors out. Walled gardens might work for minors, but then you have the problem of keeping the predators out. I'm more in favor of aggressively banning predators from the web in general, but that can also be difficult to enforce.
 
D

Deleted member 82554

Guest
We already have someone to teach us about Internet etiquette and it's this glorious bastard.

 
S

Sagt

Guest
Redacted by staff
I don't see why your passport would have to be British. Your passport, regardless of the nationality, is still universally a valid proof of age ID I'm pretty sure. That would be a bit unfair to non-citizen residents otherwise if it wasn't.

As long as it's not expired, it probably should work lol. (Although, you could apply for a provisional drivers license if it really doesn't work, assuming you don't already have a proper one.)

I mean, the UK recently thought about doing that with 18+ sites, shall we say (in regards to the proof of age stuff). I didn't think something like that would work.

Predators and hateful people can still get on if they lie, so there's that. Banning people who already have a criminal record for that stuff might be a better option, but then, that could be taken too far.
I'm pretty sure that was for porn specifically, so I doubt the intention was to restrict hateful people and predators. And as I remember, the proposal didn't go anywhere in the end.

But yeah, I'd generally agree that it was dumb.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Simo

Professional Watermelon Farmer
I think it's a good idea to encourage better manners, kindness, empathy and pro-social behavior in general, and to take a look at how they function in particular on the internet: though I think making it mandatory would backfire: many kids would rebel all the more against the notion.

Instead, I think being the change you want to see, being the role model that makes others want to aspire to, and having that model be one that is not a snarky, blustering bully would help more...though in today's over-heated climate, even the leaders of great nations are in no way how I'd want my kids to act, if I had any.

I think society needs to step back, and take a long, hard look at what we encourage, and how: youth learn, augment and expand upon actions and ideals they see displayed around them, especially by those in positions of power and fame. When we have such a poor example of manners in office and on Twitter at 1 Pennsylvania Ave., we have long way to go in teaching either kindness or etiquette in internet spaces.
 
Last edited:
M

ManicTherapsid

Guest
Being in my early 30s, it's kind of an interesting topic seeing how people my age and the internet sort of "grew up together" and each equally influenced the other, seeing what it was, what it became etc. Wereas the younger gen grew up with it already engrained and the boomers more or less reluctantly adapted to it late.

*beer reflection*
 

Anthrasmagoria

Space Cadet
I think the best approach to the internet would be as it was in the beginning: be careful, don't give your details out, and don't feed the trolls. If someone's being offensive, block them, turn the computer off and go outside, "sticks and stones", etc.

I am against censorship and I'm against forcing people to do mandatory things.

The best way - I think - to overcome becoming upset at annoying people is not to nurse your sensitivity by trying to be safe, but to learn how to become immune to it. I say that as someone who overcame social chronic anxiety. Trying to police everyone else doesn't work, but learning how to disengage/disconnect successfully from bad people and situations, and make yourself strong will. :)
 
Last edited:

quoting_mungo

Well-Known Member
I feel all nostalgic now. I remember when I started using the Internet, there was, like... actual talk about netiquette. The "art" (and I use that sarcastically) of being a dick on the Internet was still in its infancy. This is part of why I feel pressuring/pushing parents to take some responsibility for their offspring needs to be part of any solution to the problem of people acting like jackasses the moment they have a screen between themselves and whatever they want to mock. (This also means keep an eye on whatever your kid is doing online and stop pushing for legislation that'll make others do it for you.)

I think a portion of it is also down to not having the full realization that people online are, well, people. You may intellectually know they're people, but only in a vague sort of theorethical way. There's an amount of othering that needs to take place in order for the really nasty behavior to thrive. And the current social climate both on- and offline is rife with othering.
 

Angelcakes

Well-Known Member
A kind of online etiquette class would actually be a good idea, but it obviously isn't the be-all, end-all solution.
 

Zehlua

Magepunk Fashionisto
I think it would be fantastic. Some people genuinely don't know how to behave, and if there's a basic class with common knowledge taught at a young age, it'll use peer pressure to an advantage. Like when people shame each other for acting childish or not knowing how to spell simple words or do first grade math. Just some musings. I'll be thinking about this post and mulling over more.
 
F

fulffy512

Guest
With how big social media has got wouldn't surprise me this poping up in school. Since every teen or 20 something who join's is just a edgy asshole who can't handle when it back fires or can't handle any opinion that different from them.
 

Canis Dirus

Extinct Pleistocene canid

Fallowfox

Are we moomin, or are we dancer?
I'm pretty sure that was for porn specifically, so I doubt the intention was to restrict hateful people and predators. And as I remember, the proposal didn't go anywhere in the end.

But yeah, I'd generally agree that it was dumb.

The British government claims it will bring this regulation into force on the 15th of July this year, but they've also claimed they'd bring it in months ago- and didn't.
...and they're also going to be having a leadership contest at that time, so who really knows.

I think eventually the tories will end up trying to introduce a block on mature content, but that it will be ineffective and that the details used to verify the age of porn site users will eventually be released in a hack.
 

Rochat

Stay pawsitive.
I honestly like the beautiful shit storm that the internet is. That's part of the entertainment value. If anything I'd be in favor of the major social media sites rolling back rules on offensive content.
 
Top